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cosmic
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« on: October 15, 2008, 01:21:34 PM »

I am going to run in a 5k a week from this Sunday, 11 days from now.

I was just curious from the runners here, what is the best training I can do in the next week and a half? I know I could complete the race right now, so it is not an issue of training to be able to do it, but just what is the best training so my performance is the best it could be on race day.

I haven't run in a road race since I was a kid, and back then I didn't think about training, I just showed up on race day and did it.
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surf88
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« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2008, 02:14:57 PM »

Run! I would try to do a couple 3 milers, and then a 5 miler and then take 3 days off before the race.  Thats what I would do.  But, I'm sure there will be desenting oppinions.  There is all kinds of completely conflicting advice on this kind of stuff from amatuers and trained professionals alike.
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Rage
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2008, 02:18:52 PM »

Not a professional runner in any way but this is what worked for me.  

Before I switched over to pedaling I was doing a lot of running on the treadmill/track and some days was running 3 miles which is about the same as a 5k.

My advice-  

-I would do 3 days in a row running 1 day off
-make sure you steatch before and after and don't forget your calfs.
-if your just starting run/jog at the track for 1 mile for 2-3 days and then begin to bump it up.
-concentrate on your breathing (in through the nose out through the mouth) really helps against cramps
-when running, run as relaxed as you can (don't tense up)
-most importantly, when your thinking about quiting DON'T, its really mind over matter and your body will get in a groove and your legs will just keep going.

Once I got semi-comfortable running 1.5 miles I began to bump up the distance and then the miles just start adding up quick.  It seemed every day I was able to add 1/4 to 1/2 a miles to my run.  

Those are the things that I found to really help me.  I was only training to run 1.5 miles = 2.4 km but my time had to be under 11 min 50 secs.  So I would keep switching up my training.  Nice easy pace for 2-3 miles a couple days and then run as fast as I could just for that 1.5 miles, but your only concerned with endurance rather than speed.  So I would just concentrate on your breathing and running relaxed.  
  
Reason I switched was shin splints/achy knees.  I found pedaling much more enjoyable and easier on my body.  
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Rage
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« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2008, 02:20:09 PM »

and then take 3 days off before the race. 

Very good point.  I agree.
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cosmic
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« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2008, 03:13:51 PM »

Yeah I figured I should take a couple days off before the race, I was thinking 1 day(i.e. run friday before the race, take saturday off, race sunday). But as you suggest surf, maybe I should up that. So you're saying take Thursday thru Saturday off? Seems like too much, but maybe that is what it takes for a full recovery to avoid starting at a deficit.

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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2008, 04:24:55 PM »

I know Jen takes two days off before her races but then again she has been training off and all all year so three days may not be a bad idea. I would say let your body tell you. If you feel good three days before run. If you are hurting rest for three days.
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surf88
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« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2008, 05:12:21 PM »

Yeah I figured I should take a couple days off before the race, I was thinking 1 day(i.e. run friday before the race, take saturday off, race sunday). But as you suggest surf, maybe I should up that. So you're saying take Thursday thru Saturday off? Seems like too much, but maybe that is what it takes for a full recovery to avoid starting at a deficit.


Thats what I do and it works for me.  I'ld imagine that everyones recovery rate is different.  The possibly specious reasoning I use to calculate 3 days for me is that; when I do a workout that makes me sore it usually takes 3 days for the soreness to go away.  So I figure it takes about that long for my muscles to recover. 
Rage's point about relaxing is super important.  I remember when reading Dean Karnazes book he talked about how he would actually fall asleep while running.  So I practiced actually trying to relax to a point like I would in bed right before I fell a sleep, even sometimes closing my eyes for moments while running.  Being that relaxed can put you in a real nice rythm, and you end up using a lot less energy.
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« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2008, 09:28:45 PM »

my point of view as a 17 year old XC runner doing 25+ miles a week and racing 1-2 times a week is prob. not relevant. I would follow what surf and rage suggested. How much have you been training? If you're running regularly over your race distance, then you should be set. Take it easy the day after, and take it easy the day before. And during the race, don't be afraid to run out of your comfort zone.



and in all honesty, not much you do in the next 7 days is gonna make a difference to your race, as long as you keep exercising. I've made PRs after a weekend of skiing.
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cosmic
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« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2008, 07:34:41 AM »

I went out last night after a steak dinner Roll Eyes and ran a 5k on the greenway in my town.

This is the greenway:
http://www.techsourceconsultants.com/smf/index.php?topic=359.0
(Yes, I have gone back and read most of the old threads)

It is a good place for nighttime runs because it is paved (don't have to worry about footwork), but is not the road (don't have to worry about getting hit by a car). It also runs about 1/8 mile from my house, so I just run down my street, cross Rt.64 and I'm on it. It was a great night to be out, with the near full moon, and cool air.

When I got back, Kate and I shared a bottle of wine and watched the debate.

After that, I slept like a baby until I was awoken at 3 am to the sound of a mouse running around in my ceiling. It is a dropped ceiling so I am going to put some surprises up there for him tonight...
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surf88
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« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2008, 07:42:55 AM »

That greenway looks like a great place to run.  I never saw that old TR before, I liked it.  I love running at night.  Its so relaxing, with only the noise of your feet on the pavement to distract you.
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Rage
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« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2008, 07:59:28 AM »

I was thinking last night that daylight would be your biggest obstacle to overcome with your training.  Were you able to run the whole time? 
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cosmic
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« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2008, 08:46:34 AM »

Yeah, training in the daylight right now is pretty much not an option on weekdays, since I leave for work in the dark and get home in the dark-

I did run the whole time, and felt pretty good too. It took 27 minutes, so three nine minute miles. I'm pretty happy with that pace. I could probably push myself harder than I did last night too, maybe take off a minute or two in a race situation.

To answer your question Dave, in terms of training, I just started road running last week. I have been doing a lot of hiking, with trail running. I also have never been a very serious runner. I have dabbled in it but it never stuck. Like I have said before, I need a looming challenge to keep focused on getting exercise. So I gave myself this little goal to work for- and I figured a 5k was a do-able distance for me out of the box. And then when this one is over, I will find another one to sign up for.

My primary goal is to be in the kind of shape necessary to take a weekend at Tux in reasonable stride. Yes, I did it last April, but it was a little harder than I would like it to be.

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Rage
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« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2008, 09:19:01 AM »

I did run the whole time, and felt pretty good too. It took 27 minutes, so three nine minute miles.

Thats awesome.  I know when I first started runnng after 8 years of never running I thought it would be very simple to go out and do an 8 min mile.  Boy was I surprised at how out of shape I really was.  I think the first day I only ran 3/4 of a mile and walked 3/4 of a mile.  That was a very depressing.

Atruss can tell you, we went to the local high school and ran on the track.  I think he only made it 1 mile and I pushed ahead to 1.5 but I really pushed myself to make that last 1/2 mile.
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atruss
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« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2008, 05:33:35 PM »

Dave, the look on  your face is priceless, every time I see that shot, I wonder what that woman was handing you.

Here's my interpretation
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David Howland
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« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2008, 06:39:04 PM »

running pictures are always the best. The card is how we keep track of who finishes in what place. The scorekeeper writes down the time that each place came in, and then you identify yourself with the card at the end.
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