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surf88
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« on: November 25, 2008, 08:53:33 PM »

Like others on this board I too am proficient and love many sports, but I am a master of none.  and as I age I notice it gets harder and harder to train for all.  Unfortunately sports like surfing overhead waves, ice climbing, Mountain Biking, Backcountry Skiing, and Ridge Running are not very forgiving if you are not in shape.  Right now I'm really struggling with what training I should be focusing on, because I'm starting to think I cant maintain it all.  Running seems to be pretty universal in its benefits so I'm mostly running, and then training for each specific sport just prior to its upcoming season.  But that does not seem to be cutting it anymore.  I know there are others on this board that are more fit, more cross trained, and more aged than I and would value any advice.
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2008, 09:56:45 PM »

Seems like from your trip reports you are in just fine shape! Not sure how old you are there old man but
I'm in my 30's and know the pain of getting older + beating your body senseless during the process.
When I started off road riding a few years back I notice my core strength sucked. Never having issue
with skiing and other sports I have been doing for ever, I realized I didn't have a solid strength training plan.
I started with crunches, pull-up / push-up workouts in the morning before work. After a while I worked some
weights into the mix. Not a gym fan so this is all at home, also I stretch daily in the morning and night.
Mild yoga, you know all the crap you said you would never do when you were grinding curbs as a skater punk.
getting old stinks.  Grin Alternative = Wii Fit! I bet Tommy has some good information on this topic the man has
kept unbelievably active over the years.
« Last Edit: November 25, 2008, 10:03:02 PM by stuckinjersey » Logged

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atruss
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« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2008, 10:16:28 PM »

In my eyes Surf, your a complete animal that can hike distances in one day make my bones hurt reading your reports.

I too have an issue with training, because I have literally no time, working 2 jobs, running a small web dev business, and taking one graduate course really sucks the life out of you.

I try to get out on weekends for hikes, and I've been trying to lengthen them greatly to help out, and sometimes I carry weight, but my wife isn't a large hiker at all, so I can't bring her, and relationship wise I can't ditch her every weekend either, so I try to do something hiking related whenever I have a day off, when I'm sick, when we get into arguments, and anything else that spontanioiusly pops up.

I've been climbing for the past two seasons now, and that has to help with something, 50+ days last season, and 50+ days this season with harder climbs with much greater ease than last.

I'm on my feet all day teaching and I usually eat a light lunch, so that should count for something.

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« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2008, 07:50:51 AM »

I've never really done much training for anything but now I'm beginning to see the advantages.  Most on here know that for the last 6 months I've been very determined to get myself back into shape for many reasons.  I ran on the track/treadmill for awhile than switched to riding a bike and now I onto the eliptical.

Any way my thoughts on how to specifically train for a sport is to simulate what you'll be doing as best as possible.  Of course thats hard for some things like skiing, surfing etc...

But Im hugee fan of cardio and really think thats the best way to get a semi all in one.  Again I am on the elipitcal now and like it because it does work your upper & lower body at the same time, but I know once I start skinning with 40lbs on my back no matter how much cadio I do im sure Im still going to feel beat. 
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cosmic
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2008, 08:13:53 AM »

Alternative = Wii Fit!

How is that game? Can you really use it for a decent workout? If so, I might have to make a little entertainment system upgrade  Grin
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2008, 10:05:41 AM »

How is that game? Can you really use it for a decent workout?
I actually bought the board for the Wii Ski game which is killer but
I have to say you can get a little work out from the thing. It's all basic
exercises and yoga, running, step, crap like that but it has you raising the
heart beat pretty quickly. I only use the yoga program on it but it's cool because it
can sense when you are not putting your weight in the right areas or if you
alignment is screwed up. Helpful little thing.
I know once I start skinning with 40lbs on my back no matter how much cadio I do im sure Im still going to feel beat. 
I will first say congrats on getting yourself back in shape. Not the easiest thing to do and then stick with! Keep it up.
Lifting brother, that is about it. Or since you like the cardio so much a weight vest can give you the same work out plus
more. Like atruss was doing with his back pack during his ADK training.
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surf88
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« Reply #6 on: November 26, 2008, 10:27:27 AM »

Thanks all for the input.  Im 33, and its the Mountain Biking thats giving me the most trouble.  Last winter I actually for the first time trained all winter long on the stationary bike in hopes of having a good summer.  instead, it seemed like every time I got on the bike i hurt something.  I think, I'll try focusing on my core a little more.  Time for yoga. I'll just have to drink beer while I do it so I dont feel too girly.  Grin
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Tommy T
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« Reply #7 on: November 26, 2008, 04:46:38 PM »

I believe in core strength, flexibility and balance.  Pilates is a good way to get a quick once-a-day that emphasizes core strength while throwing in moderate flex and stretch exercise.  I add some balance during regular activities -- standing on one foot while tooth brushing kind of stuff.   I think that the core/flex/balance combo gives plenty of fitness for any sport at a recreational level and is the best routine for preventing injury and delaying general age related decay.

I'll add sport specific stretching for the winter or if involved in a period of vigorous paddling.

I think that sport specific strength is often misunderstood.  Stationary bike is not necessarily the best strengthening exercise for a biker in the winter.  Specific full range reps for the thighs and hamstrings would be better for off season.  Then some high speed spinning just before and into the start of the biking racing season. 

I no longer like runing for daily exercise.  In fact, in general, even sources like the editors of Running Magazine admitted that they had overdone the l.s.d. everyday regime and there were a lot of injuries and wear and tear as a result.  In general, cariovascular fitness is a good thing, but maintaining it at a healthy level, as opposed to an Olympic marathoner level, doesn't take much.  I think that just ordinary activities like skiing, paddling, hiking, recrerational biking, clearing hurricane debris, or a half-hour of pick-up basketball, done a few times a week, is all that is needed for an enjoyable long life.

That said, I have done hard cardio (running) when preparing for altitude and I have run an hour a day every day when I was orienteering competitively but those are pretty different things than my general snowboarding, backpacking, mountain biking and paddling. 

Tommy T.


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« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2008, 08:13:43 PM »

I agree that strength training, especially as you get older, is the best way to stay fit for a variety of endeavors.  Core exercises and
"self-weight" exercies (pushups, pullups, dips) I do 3-4x/week.  Add some more focused weight training 2x/week.
Cross training is great but if you want to significantly improve at something, then you gotta get specific.   I'm an admitted cardio-junkie, with running being my drug of choice.  Been doing it since junior high, so coming up on 30 years.  I still get in over 2500 running miles a year (in fact last week I surpassed 2500 running miles for 2008).  I have battled one running-related injury (achilles tendonitis) in that entire time so you will not get me to admit extended running breaks you down.  I completely disagree with that.
However, adding "down time" throughout the year is huge.  You might think (and it took me quite awhile to see the benefits) that you're losing fitness, but a week or two of no or VERY limited cardio does wonders.  It allows minor aches/pains to quiet down and allows your body to get ready for another building session.
My general training starts with base building of exclusively running in mid November.  Build a consistent base of weekly miles.  No speedwork (maybe an occasional race into early December).  Longer runs on the weekend and a hill workout every other week.  Mix in some skiing of course!!
Come March/April I'll begin substituting hike-for-turns days in lieu of running.  Still getting that cardio workout but now without the day to day pounding.  This also acts as an "active rest" period for me from running.  As the Mt. Washington season begins to wind down, I'll start adding in the bike once (sometimes twice) a week.  Late May I'll begin higher intensity workouts (tempo/threshold runs) along with some anaerobic track workouts.  Then late July into mid September I'll jack the weekly mileage up.  Biking will stop around mid August.  September and October are key race months and mileage begins dropping after mid September.  Sometime end of October/early November is a stretch of 10-14 days of no running or at most 1/3 of my usual distance.

I'm just using my routine as a template.  It's been working nicely for me and maybe just take the principals and apply to other activities.
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surf88
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« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2008, 12:26:43 AM »

Thanks D.  I was really hoping you would chime in on this one.
I have been doing a ski specific plyometrics routine the last few weeks to get ready for the ski season.  Because I plan on skiing more this year than I have in the last few.  Its been kicking my butt, I'm curious to see how much it will help.
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atruss
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« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2008, 09:39:46 AM »

Good info Dj,

I'm no runner; a hiker, yes.
I want to improve my cardio and I have just started running a little on the weekends, in hopes it will help.

I'm not out of shape but in terms running well.... I haven't ran for over 2 years

Last weekend I ran at a slow pace 4.2 miles continuous, with small walks in between to catch my breath.
My legs were soar after that let me tell you.

This weekend I am going to repeat the same run, and hope I feel stronger during and days after during recovery.

Do any of you guys think I should be going about this another way?

I'm trying to get ready for the Katahdin trip in Jan, and I don't want to be huffin and puffin the whole trip.
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