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Author Topic: 10k Training/Results  (Read 3486 times)
cosmic
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« on: June 21, 2009, 12:37:12 PM »

To start my Father's Day off right, I got up at 6am and went and ran a race. I decided to up the ante this time and run a 10k instead of the usual 5k.

I met my sister at Lake Compounce in Bristol, CT at about 7:15, we picked up our race packets went to the starting line and discussed our strategies. Neither of us have run this distance in competition so we were hesitant to push ourselves too hard. I mentioned that I was going to stick to an 8:30 min/mile pace, which I knew I could somewhat comfortably do from training. My sister said she would also run that pace and not go crazy this time.  I went out at what I thought was a comfortable pace, but my GPS was telling me I was going too fast: about 7:30 min/mile. For some reason, the pace was nice and comfortable, and I couldn't see a good reason to slow down. After only a minute or two, my sister was already probably 100 yards ahead of me so she was apparently bitten by the same competition bug as me.

I ended up finishing in 48:23,  7:48 min/mile pace. I was 9th overall out of 44 runners, and 2nd in my age group, after you skim off the top three finishers.

My sister finished in 46:08. She was 8th overall, and top female finisher.
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atruss
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2009, 02:25:12 PM »

Thats great !

I know I can do a 5k, but a 10k would be difficult for me.

I need to get back out there and start running, its been several weeks trying to get rid of the shin splints and home improvement projects.

Congrats to both of you in your placements.

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« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2009, 07:47:32 AM »

discussed our strategies

Run fast and don't stop until you pass the finish line. 

Good job, I was wondering how you two did.  Did you find it much more difficult or pretty much the same? 
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cosmic
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« Reply #3 on: June 22, 2009, 09:37:29 AM »


Run fast and don't stop until you pass the finish line. 

yeah, that seems to be how it ends up no matter our discussion beforehand

Did you find it much more difficult or pretty much the same? 

Pretty much the same. I think that pace is a comfortable one for me right now, be it for 5k, 10k or beyond.
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« Reply #4 on: June 22, 2009, 06:17:37 PM »

Nice Job.  I'm planning on running the local race here next saturday.  The Gofffstown Gallup is a 5.2 Miler  that goes up and around a good size hill (Google Earth shows about 170 ft of elevation gain at its hghest point).  It is actually one of my running routes I do from my house, but I usually do the loop  in the oppposite direction than the race goes.
I've actually started to get a little closer back to being in the shape I was before my string of injuries so I'm hoping I do pretty well. But I havent run a race yet this year so I dont know what to really expect.  I'm just happy to be injury free right now actually, Knock on wood.
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David Howland
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2009, 12:06:46 PM »


Pretty much the same. I think that pace is a comfortable one for me right now, be it for 5k, 10k or beyond.


I've frequently found that once I get to a certain distance and pace I can run comfortably for what seems like forever. I just get in gear and keep on going. For me, racing is pushing myself out of that comfort zone to the point where I can't run an inch more than the race distance.
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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2009, 03:44:19 PM »

Congrats on "graduating" up to the 10K.  That's a tough distance to race and is really the level at which consistent training is absolutely necessary.  No "fudging it" for a 10K.  There's a reason why on any given weekend you can find plenty of 5K distances to choose from, a decent number of 4/5 milers yet very few 10K distance or longer.
Not to downplay the difficulty of a 5K - shorter races can still hurt like hell.  Once a hard effort starts getting over say 25-30 minutes you're venturing into a different kind of hurt and if not properly trained you'll pay for it much longer.
Of course the next logical step after the 10K comes the half-marathon Wink
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cosmic
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« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2009, 07:56:23 PM »

Of course the next logical step after the 10K comes the half-marathon Wink

Funny you would say that, I am actually training for the Hartford half marathon in the fall, trying to get my endurance up. Hopefully because I have so much time to train, I will actually enjoy the race and be comfortable with the distance.  I know people who "cram" their training, going from never running to doing half marathon or full in a few months. I always thought they must be miserable with such fast paced training. It's purely a I'm going to get this race over with and check it off my list of things to do in life kind of thing. Not that there is anything wrong with that, but I am curious if it is possible to run the longer races, half or full marathon and actually enjoy them.
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djming
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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2009, 08:42:31 PM »

but I am curious if it is possible to run the longer races, half or full marathon and actually enjoy them.

Sure, you can enjoy longer runs/races - they're called easy training runs!
But seriously, everyone has a different take on a "race".  IMO, if you're running a race properly, it's gonna hurt and it's gonna be tough.  The enjoyment to me is in the accomplishment.  Also at some point during a race there's the enjoyment of the competition, just trying to keep up with others, to keep someone from passing you, etc.  It doesn't always happen, but when you're in a race where things are "clicking", mentally that's such an incredible feeling and boost.  Allows for that extra push.
Okay, so yeah long races can be enjoyable, but they're still gonna hurt.
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cosmic
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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2009, 10:35:25 AM »

I guess I was wondering is, is it possible to run 26 miles, not racing, and have it be more or less enjoyable? Or have you simply passed a point where no matter the training you have done, it's just going to hurt like hell and be a crazy mental hurdle? I think a lot of people participate in long races not to win or get their best possible time, but to simply finish, and they all report it was one of the hardest things they ever did.
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djming
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« Reply #10 on: June 24, 2009, 11:49:52 AM »

I guess I was wondering is, is it possible to run 26 miles, not racing, and have it be more or less enjoyable? Or have you simply passed a point where no matter the training you have done, it's just going to hurt like hell and be a crazy mental hurdle? I think a lot of people participate in long races not to win or get their best possible time, but to simply finish, and they all report it was one of the hardest things they ever did.

Sorry for possibly the way my previous post came across.
My opinion on your question is that yes it's possible but not very likely.  Once you start getting over 2-2.5 hours of steady running (no matter what pace, it's more the consistent heart rate that matters), your body reaches a point where it begins rapidly depleting glycogen stores.  Once those are depleted, you're going into other areas for energy that aren't as easy to process.  By consistent, very long training you can extend the period of depletion.  But few of us have the desire and time to "overtrain" for marathon distances which is what it would take to be reasonbly assured of a nice, feel good the whole way marathon.  Or, you'd have to carefully plan eating along the way to keep energy stores up, which would limit how hard you could run and avoid stomach issues.
With solid training you can have a marathon (I've experienced a couple) where you just back off and cruise.  Still it catches up in those last few miles and you're still pretty beat up afterwards.
Hope this is helpful.
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cosmic
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« Reply #11 on: June 24, 2009, 12:46:22 PM »

that's interesting-

Thanks for the responses, it is much appreciated-
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