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Author Topic: Upcoming Races/Training Goals  (Read 3425 times)
djming
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« on: June 30, 2009, 08:44:43 PM »

With the recent 5K/10K training discussions, it sounds like more are gettin' hooked on the running bug.
So what do people have as objectives, goals or definite plans?
I've been putting in some very good training of late (okay, actually all year has been good) and I'm feeling in very good condition for this time of year.  Ran a course PR by 18 seconds at a local 6K race (I've run it 4 times), hitting 19:52 or just under 5:30/mile. Actually running as fast or faster than I was in my mid/late-30's.  I'll enjoy it while I can!
Planning on a pretty challenging 5 miler (actually 4.9) on the 4th. 
The following week a real low-key triathlon.  250yd swim (thank god not longer...), 13 mile very rolling bike and 5K run. It's not on any "official" tri race schedule, just something that some friends of mine put on by his lake place in RI.  We get about 30 people or so to anty up $10 each for the lake association and have a kick a** cookout afterwards!  My objective is to simply avoid being last out of the water, then pick people off on the bike and run (last year I caught all but one).

After that I kinda play it by ear depending on weather (avoiding extremely hot/humid days for racing) and hiking plans.  But between end of August and mid October I'll do a couple 5 milers, a couple 5K cross-country races and hopefully a good 1/2 marathon.

Would love to hear what others are thinking, or if ya got any questions, I'll do my best to help out.
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David Howland
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2009, 01:14:53 AM »

I've finally been able to get my mileage to consistantly climb after sorting out my shoe, achilles, and foot issues. I'm training for the Falmouth Road Race (7.1 miles) and I'm gonna start doing my local 5-mile races on Friday nights. Other than that, i'm looking towards XC and track in college.
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cosmic
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2009, 09:56:04 AM »

So what do people have as objectives, goals or definite plans?
My long term goal right now is to run the Hartford 1/2 marathon in the fall. In the back of my mind I have been toying with the idea of running a full a year after that, in the fall of '10, probably Hartford again. I am trying to make sure I get out once a week and do a long run - I am up to 11 miles, and a couple shorter runs mid week, in the range of 3 to 6 miles. I am keeping my eyes open for the longer races until the fall, it looks like there is an 8M near the end of July that I am probably going to register for.

Ran a course PR by 18 seconds at a local 6K race (I've run it 4 times), hitting 19:52 or just under 5:30/mile.
Wow that's fast- that must be awesome to run that fast. I can dip into the high 6's now for probably about a mile if I really push. 5:30/mile sounds impossibly far off. Did your speed come naturally over time, or do you specifically train for it? I know there is a big difference between training for speed and training for endurance, and I have heard it said that it is easier to train to run longer distances, than it is to train to run faster.

Good luck in your 5M this saturday, let us know how you do.
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surf88
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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2009, 11:48:35 AM »

My goal is to run the manchester 5k this year in under 21 minutes.  Not impressive, but hopefully realistic.
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djming
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« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2009, 09:16:08 PM »

I'm training for the Falmouth Road Race (7.1 miles) and I'm gonna start doing my local 5-mile races on Friday nights. Other than that, i'm looking towards XC and track in college.

I've never run Falmouth.  I have run the Cape Cod Marathon and that hits much of the Falmouth course.  Are they still doing a lottery? Another great race that's usually the same weekend is the Brew Run in Brewster (5.2).  More manageable numbers (but still close to a 1000 usually run), nice course and FREE BEER.
It will be a nice adjustment to college XC distance, 8-10K as opposed to 5K max in high school.  Fun stuff though and the races are FAST.

Did your speed come naturally over time, or do you specifically train for it? I know there is a big difference between training for speed and training for endurance, and I have heard it said that it is easier to train to run longer distances, than it is to train to run faster.

I've always had some natural speed.  Mind you, I've never run national-level type times but in college I was able to run sub 5's for 5K and sub 5:15 for 10K.  But everything's in perspective - I went to a DIII school and still had to fight to make our top 7 in XC.  We had 4 guys who could go close to 14:30 5K and sub 31:00 10K.  At a good division one program I'd have had trouble being a walk-on!  So, while I did have some natural abililty, I trained hard in college, learned what works and just kept it up (albeit now slower but still decent for my age).

As to speed versus distance training, it's easier to train your body for distance in the sense that (barring injuries), you just keep increasing your mileage.  Speed training is a bit of a catch 22 in that you shouldn't start specific speed training without a solid distance base.  Speed training, to be done properly and most effective, should be much more precise.  No guessing as to distances covered.  Also, improper speed training or too much/too soon can very quickly lead to injuries.  Finally, there is more of a "born with it" factor with speed versus endurance.

Anyway, there are a couple good basic workouts to get started.  A good speed/endurance combo workout is 800 repeats, done at a pace roughly equal to your 5K pace (so, if you run 7's for a 5K, do 800's in 3:45 or just a bit faster).  Target doing 8 800's, with a slow walk/jog after each one to recover.
More speed-specific workouts would be 200's and/or 400's at 30-50 seconds faster than 5K race pace.  My example (based on 5:30/mile):
5K pace = 5:30/mile.  30 seconds faster = 5:00 pace = 75 seconds for 400's.  60 seconds faster = 4:30 pace = 72.5 seconds for 400's. This gives my range for 400 repeats (72 is too fast and won't allow me to effectively complete the workout, 76 is too slow except for the first couple).
For 200's, ratchet it down another notch, dividing your fast-end 400 by 2 and subtract 1-3 seconds (so in my case I target 33-35 seconds,  for 200's). 
In addition to these workouts hurting while you do them, you will very likely be sore the day after doing these workouts, as you quickly build lactic acid.  Key is to do at least 15 minutes easy jogging before and after the workout, plus stretch before AND after, and hydrate.  Just like with distance however the more you do them, the quicker your body recovers.  NEVER do back to back speed session days and until you really are used to them should stick to one a week.

Hope this is helpful.  Of course, just getting out and running (and not getting bogged down with these kinds of workout) is better than not running at all!
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cosmic
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2009, 03:22:33 PM »

This is very helpful. I will definitely be referring back to this thread when I get into some interval training.
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djming
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2009, 08:44:48 PM »

This is very helpful. I will definitely be referring back to this thread when I get into some interval training.
And feel free to ask any questions, I'll answer as best I can.  Another way to look at the speed/distance thing is that you don't need speed to train for long distances, but you need a distance base to train for speed.

BTW, ran my local Independence Day race (4.9 miles), setting a course personal best of 27:57 (works out to 5:43/mile on a challenging course).  Best part was I actually won the darn thing, which was totally unexpected.  Showed up with one of my training partners and we didn't see any real fast guys.  A couple of youngsters took the pace out and we followed thru the slightly downhill first mile in 5:21.  On the first series of rolling hills I made a couple of surges to test the others and only my friend Jason and one other kid could follow.  A big hill leading up to mile 3 and the kid passed me, but I slowly made ground back to him, catching him back about 3.5.  I put a big surge in and broke open a 30 yard or so lead by the 4th mile.  I was hoping Jason could come with me but he fell back.  I could tell I was getting into the red zone, thought maybe I could keep pushing but then if I blew up I'd lose the race.  Backed off just a bit, then with 1/4 mile to go, just as the kid was catching back up I really stepped on the gas and outkicked him by 4 seconds.  Not bad to be able to hold off someone half my age!  Ended up winning a sweet trophy plus a $25 gas card (all for a $5 entry fee).  Plus the race had some great grub afterwards - chowder, hot dogs, sandwiches, cookies.  Not a bad way to spend the morning.
The race results should be posted on a running site shortly and will post a link once they're up.
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cosmic
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« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2009, 08:55:39 AM »

Congratulations on winning the race!

It's amazing how much strategizing goes on mid race. Even if you are not in the lead, you are competing with the few people around you, looking for signs of weakness to make a move
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