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jjj4762
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« on: January 11, 2010, 12:30:04 PM »

If not crampons, then what?  Crampons seem too heavy duty for a hike in the WeHa reservoir.  What are people wearing for conditions are slick but crampons seem like overkill?  Yak Traks?  Stabilicers?  Kahtoolah Micro Spikes?
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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2010, 12:35:40 PM »

I have been useing Stabilicers and am happy with the traction. They seem like they will last me many years also. YackTracks just seem like they would wear out fast. I have never used them though.
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2010, 12:54:55 PM »

Stick to the Micro Spikes or Stables, the Yaks are more for street walking in icy conditions and yes they
wear out quickly once uneven ground with rocks / sticks get involved. Don't waste your cash.
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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2010, 02:40:32 PM »

What they said.

But if your walking on their roads there, Yaks will work well.
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« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2010, 03:17:59 PM »

I like yak traks.  The ones you buy at EMS are a lot more heavy duty then the ones they sell at Wal Mart.  I use em alot and as long as they are big enough they last a long time.  Ive found if they fit over your boot tightly they wear out and snap alot faster.  The meter readers that work for me put about fifty miles on there's every winter and they have had the same sets for about 3 years.
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Rage
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« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2010, 09:32:33 AM »

I like yak traks. 

I have a set of them too and like them a lot.  They haven't had a ton of use but have been happy with them and show no real signs of wear. 

I haven't tried the other options out there but between yaktraks and crampons I think I pretty good for traction.   
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jjj4762
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« Reply #6 on: January 15, 2010, 07:14:50 PM »

I bought the MicroSpikes from Kahtoola.  At $60 each, they are more than twice the cost of the Yaks, but hoping that they are more aggressive.  Need to test them out now!
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2010, 01:22:57 PM »

http://www.timefortuckerman.com/forums/showthread.php?p=140104#post140104
Check out the link good read. So at the bottom of the article it had a statement that rang to me and I remember JJJ's post here. So Micro spikes worked for you but don't put too much faith into the them. This cat slid into Kings Ravine about 2/3's down the ravine and luckily hit nothing. He also might have been a jack-a$$ that was messing around getting to close to something, never know but won't want to find out the hard way.

Quote:
The underlying lesson this incident carries for other hikers is the importance of being prepared for the unexpected in the outdoors. “They were not planning on hiking in technical terrain and packed accordingly,” said Gralenski. Soholt was wearing “micro crampons” (similar to ice creepers) and carrying ski poles.

“It is still very much winter above treeline. Although many trails above treeline are not viewed as technical terrain, they are very icy. And, as this incident shows, unexpected accidents can have dire consequences," Gralenski said. "Micro crampons have their place in hiking, but it is not on the Gulfside Trail or any other alpine trails near technical terrain. Traditional crampons and an ice axe, not ski poles, should be standard equipment in this area. If Soholt had these two pieces of gear, he most likely would have been able to prevent his fall or self-arrest immediately after the fall. Not having them could have easily been a fatal mistake.”
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jjj4762
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2010, 01:39:09 PM »

Wow, thanks for sharing...I have to admit I have possibly been a little too trusting of the Micro Spikes. I will say that I used my ice axe to self-arrest on the way down, but with crampons in my bag, I probably should have just taken the time to put the things on.  The spikes have some teeth near the toe, and I think that helps the climb, but they are pretty lacking on the heel for descents. 
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Tommy T
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« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2010, 03:16:06 PM »

It can be safe to travel with ice ax and no crampons but it is generally not safe to wear crampons in a climbing or mountain travel situation without an ax.

If you are wearing crampons, you have got to get them up and out of the way in a fall.  Then, the ax is used to self-arrest.  Without an ax, you either dig in the crampons and start tumbling or you get them up out of the snow/ice and have nothing to use to slow down.

Remember that self-arresting with an ax is best done in the first seconds of a slide.  As speed picks up, the ax becomes less and less reliable.

Practice, practice, practice.

Tommy T.
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« Reply #10 on: December 01, 2010, 09:49:52 AM »

Ok I change my position now, I'm a convert.  Microspikes for me now.  I still like how yak traks walk better, and I can make better time in them, but I am now convinced that the micropikes are definitely more durable.
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #11 on: December 01, 2010, 10:20:19 AM »

Yaks are great but really for walking around a lake or a sidewalk. Microspikes are way more tough. Darrel has the stabolicers I wonder how those have held up for him.
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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #12 on: December 01, 2010, 02:09:05 PM »

Darrel has the stabolicers I wonder how those have held up for him.

Are bomb proof and appear to never wear out. I how ever do not suggest them. I would also suggest micro spikes. They seem lighter, easier to put on and you get better traction with micro spikes. They seem like the hands down winner, even if they do not last as long as stabolicers. The micro spike out perform the stabolicers.

I would say that the stabolicers are better than yak tracks.
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