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Dsmith3232
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« on: March 12, 2010, 10:08:30 AM »

This April I plan on doing a “first” for me.
My plan is to hike up Tux with the intent to take photos and try to capture the steepness of it all. The best way I can think if to do this is to hike up the slope.

My thought is that on my way up I will from time to time step off the boot latter to be able to take the time and snap a few shots of skiers going down. (I would only step off to get out of the way of others going up.)

Once on top I would not ski down. I would then hike solo up to the ridge and connect with the established hiking trail.
My hike down would either be via boot spur link or LionÂ’s head. IÂ’m leaning toured Boot Spur.

Of course weather will be a factor. If the weather is bad I will not go as planed.
Do you all think Snowshoes would be required in April up top?

I did a similar trip last year with Surf up HillmanÂ’s and it worked out well for me.

Your thoughts or tips?
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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2010, 10:13:50 AM »

Bring crampons and axe as it will help with your footing and will allow to cut out a shelf to stand on.

As far as pics go just make sure you do compensate the physical angle of the "camera" keep it as level as you can so that you can capture the true pitch of the slope. 

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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2010, 10:53:11 AM »

I hear that carrying all of your friends snowboards to the top makes the climb easier. Something about lowering your center of gravity or something.
I recommend you try it and tell us at the top how it goes.
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« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2010, 02:21:40 PM »

Don't Fall - Seriously; espessially with crampons on.

Stepping out of the boot ladder is possible , but can be tricky at times.

You may find yourself 3/4 of the way up, and not want to take pics due to its steepness

I know when I'm climbing the ladder all I want to do is get to the top so I can put my skis on and be comfortible
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2010, 02:29:53 PM »

Don't Fall - Seriously; espessially with crampons on.

Haha yeah this is true, I tend to not use my crampons for that reason on really steep stuff. I figure if kick stepping is not enough then maybe I don't need to go up it.
You may find yourself 3/4 of the way up, and not want to take pics due to its steepness

Same on this one too, the pitch can be the same as the first 100 feet but it just feels like any wrong move might throw you off he slope.
I was feeling saucy on this one so I took a pic below and then swung around to get above as well. THis is about 1/2 up Right Gully last Easter. Still doesn't show the steepness.

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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2010, 03:48:14 PM »

Yes I agree with the no falling also.  Shocked
I will be using my crampons and ax. I simply feel more comfortable with them than not on steeper stuff.
This will be the steepest snow slope I will have climbed. If I donÂ’t feel comfortable enough taking pictures on my way up I simply will not take them. It really isnÂ’t up to me. It is up to Mother Nature and if she feels nice enough to pose for me.
If I donÂ’t achieve what IÂ’m looking for I will not cry. It will still be an adventure.  Grin
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Tommy T
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2010, 06:07:47 PM »

This April I plan on doing a “first” for me.
My plan is to hike up Tux with the intent to take photos and try to capture the steepness of it all. The best way I can think if to do this is to hike up the slope.

"The slope" could be a lot of things.  I assume you mean up the skier's left side of the Headwall from Lunch Rocks.  I think that is probably not the best spot to get steep angle shots but it probably is the best place to be sure of seeing a lot of skiers going down.  If you can recruit some action models from among the skiers at Lunck Rocks to cooperate in exchange for promises copies of some good shots,  I would suggest Right Gully as being easier to climb, more likely to have good stances for you during photo episodes, a narrower chute so the skier lines are more predictable, and closer to background rock so the angle can be emphasized by reference to terrain features.  (Headwall is going to show a big wide expanse of snow with skiers pretty far away and the background rocks curving around the bowl which will ruin the angle references.)

Quote
My thought is that on my way up I will from time to time step off the boot latter to be able to take the time and snap a few shots of skiers going down. (I would only step off to get out of the way of others going up.)

The feasibility of this depends greatly on the snow pack but it is hard to imagine that with ax and crampons you wouldn't be able to arrange something.  Consider wearing a harness and carrying some runners so you can tie in to an anchor.  Depending on conditions, your ax could make a good anchor if you know how to place it and to tie into it.  I usually have one 12" long ice screw in my pack "just in case" and remember that if you have loose snow (not likely), your pack itself can be buried as a deadman.

Quote
Once on top I would not ski down. I would then hike solo up to the ridge and connect with the established hiking trail.
My hike down would either be via boot spur link or LionÂ’s head. IÂ’m leaning toured Boot Spur.

Link is one steep sucker!!  Link is apt to be icy!!  Link is very ledgy!!  Link is pretty far away from Tuckerman Junction (where the Tuck Trail reaches the top of the Headwall).  Once you get around to Link, if you don't like it and want a different way down, the rest of Boot Spur Trail is long and if things are melted at the Pinkham Notch level, Boot Spur Trail is a quagmire for the last half mile or so.

From the top of the Headwall, and especially from the top of Right Gully, you have a straight shot to the Lion's Head Winter Route.

Quote
Of course weather will be a factor. If the weather is bad I will not go as planed.
Do you all think Snowshoes would be required in April up top?

Maybe, but it is likely that everything will be quite solid and the trails will be well broken out.  Have them in the car and ask at Pink's but don't expect to use them.  Crampons and ax are a must.

Quote
I did a similar trip last year with Surf up HillmanÂ’s and it worked out well for me.

What you are proposing for this year is not that much different from Hillman's expept that if you go the Headwall route you have the boot ladder which is both an advantage and a disadvantage.  I don't know what you found on Hillman's last year, but, in general, in the Spring it is apt to be icier than the Headwall.  The Right Gully suggestion would probably prove to be an easier hike than Hillman's.  It's disadvantage is that it might have a lot fewer skiers than the Headwall, thus the need to recruit some actors.

Can't wait to see the pictures.

Tommy T.
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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2010, 09:05:31 AM »

Thanks Tommy,
I will have a couple of “models” as a subject. I’m going with the Jersey crew. What ever they decide to ski down is what I will be going up.
(too bad they were not the Jersey girl's as my models  Tongue )

The experience of it all and my safety is my first priority. Then comes the pictures.
IÂ’m realistic. Once IÂ’m there and Âľ of the way up I may be too bugged out by the steep to take pictures.

Last time I was there I took pictures of skiers coming down Sleuth and the Headwall from Lunch rocks. I used a 70–300mm zoom to get closer. The only shots I was happy with were the ones from Sleuth due to rocks in the background. These pictures were good but didn’t have a Tux feel to them though. I could not capture the angle from lunch rocks.
The pictures of skiers coming down the headwall were truly disappointing. Too much white out and no visible reference to angle.
TuckermanÂ’s raven is a breath taking place that I find very difficult to capture on a photo.

I hope that by climbing up. It will give me an angle that more accurately represents the feel of the skierÂ’s experience. 

As far as the snow shoe question. I am only asking for the walk from the top to the established trails. Sue it is a short walk but if I end up post holing it due to snow it could make for a rough section. So are the snow shoes required for above tree line off trail hiking is a better way for me to ask?
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Tommy T
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2010, 06:09:16 PM »


As far as the snow shoe question. I am only asking for the walk from the top to the established trails. Sue it is a short walk but if I end up post holing it due to snow it could make for a rough section. So are the snow shoes required for above tree line off trail hiking is a better way for me to ask?


Sorry, I wasn't very clear.  My comment about it being likely that everything will be pretty solid was meant to be a reference to snow conditions on the upper snowfields and the lawns between Tuckerman Junction and the Boott Spur ridge.  Of course, that could be wrong if there has been a recent snow storm or if there has been a lot of warm weather at 5000 feet.  The avi reports can sometimes give you a good clue as to the condition of the snowpack, but  the AMC activists at Pinkham are the best source of info for that sort of thing on the day in question.

Tommy T.
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« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2010, 10:53:17 PM »

That last trip worked out really well for me too.  It was a good time.  I've gone a bunch of time above the headwall in april and have never needed snowshoes,  the freeze thaw cycle that time of year usually has the snow pack pretty solid.
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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #10 on: March 15, 2010, 08:06:42 AM »

Thanks for the info guys!
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« Reply #11 on: March 16, 2010, 10:59:07 PM »

I'm glad to hear that a lot of guys with a lot more experience than myself get a little freaked out climbing up the ravine. It is absolutely scary and can really freak you out if you stop too long and start thinking too much. Its amazing how much more comfortable I feel once I click into my skiis. Can't wait to see the pics Darrel.
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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #12 on: May 14, 2010, 10:07:14 AM »

Well I was unable to hike up Tux the last trip due to weather. Hope to this time next weekend.

Do you guys think a helmet is required for hiking up?
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2010, 11:04:09 AM »

With the Ice Fall at this point in the year I wouldn't climb that with out.
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atruss
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« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2010, 11:21:24 AM »

Don't climb under hanging ice, or areas that would direct ice in your direction if it were to fall.

I have been hit in the head with golf ball size pieces of ice with my helmet on and thinking to myself "Boy am I glad I had my helmet on"

Helmet isn't a bad idea.
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