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Author Topic: Terms for different types of hiking terrain  (Read 5731 times)
surf88
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« on: July 01, 2010, 11:56:20 AM »

Does anyone know if theres commonly used terms for different types of hiking terrain?  I 've noticed I have a difficult time describing to people how different types of footing can make a hike easier or harder.  If there isnt terms for conditions of trails (.ie to describe the difference between a trail that is gravel or a trail that is like a dry riverbed, a trail that is muddy with logs to walk on.) maybe sombody should start coining terms like we have in skiing (.ie Glades, Moguls, Corduroy) to make conveying trail types easier.
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2010, 01:48:51 PM »

Sorry Jan, you know me I just have to joke around as usual. Never take a Josh seriously is what I always say. Here is my stab, hope nobody is bleeding. We could just create our own BCA trail rating system, I think just like in skiing you need a 3 way scoring system but since it's BCA we will make it a 5 way system. So it would look like if you are trail teaching to the masses.

ET - Easy terrian and UFO sightings

PET - Pretty Easy Terrian : Covers all east and west coast terrian including all everest attempts.

A$$HAT - AS$ HAT enough of this hiking crap, where is my car!!!!     Pronounced ( As Sat ) *The A$$ is silent*

WFSET - Who the F%%% Said this was Easy Terrian?Huh!

FIWTFWTWJGSH - Freaking Impossible What the F%^& Was I Thinking, Where is Jan? I'm Going to smack him! (this term will be used alot of I ever attempt that Pemi-loop)

Although I kid here, I will say I have never heard a good description of a trail, even the A/T books don't properly describe a hike perfect and it's a tough thing due to the aspect of who is the reader and their hiking level. People always ask me if a hike is hard or how long it should take, my answer is always the same. "Depends what you've hiked and how fast you can go!" What is hard to one is simple to others.
« Last Edit: July 01, 2010, 01:54:41 PM by stuckinjersey » Logged

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atruss
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« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2010, 07:55:10 PM »

Love the system Josh, gave me a good laugh, espessially A$$HAT, and FIWTFWTWJGSH.... LOL

As for all things serious.

I don't know of one, but it sure would be helpful.

My wife isn't a hiker or anything much outdoors so when I take her on a hike I think she'll enjoy I always (Not intentionally) sandbag the hike, and we end up in an argument on why I would think she would enjoy the choice I made for her.
Funny stuff if you're not in my shoes.

So if I had a hiking scale of difficulty similar to the Yosemite Climbing Scale of 5.X it would help a bunch.

We should start one, Maybe something like the Yosemite Scale; so we don't have to try and learn a new system, and use a "T" instead of a 5

Starting with T1 would be like walking on a newly paved road in the desert salt flats
to
Ending with a T14 which would be something in the range of very difficult and strenuous hiking terrain similar to the Daks High Peaks, or Whites with vertical gain considered into the rating, not added on afterward

Possibly Monadnock would be in the range of T6 - T8

And this scale would have to be in terms of the average person in reasonable shape, and not be a reflection of our own abilities.
Mandatory 5th class rock climbing within a given hiking route would not qualify for this rating system; so Everest and many other large peaks would have to be rated differently.


Just thoughts....
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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2010, 09:11:00 PM »

I do not know the climbing scale for difficulty but I get what you are saying and I think it might a good idea.
I do think the trails could also have multiple per trail.
Say the trail was easy uphill going by a brook T4 then hit a cliff trail and turn into a T11 for 2+ miles. Then back to a T7 on the rige line. This is how I remember hiking from Ethan Pond to Webster cliff trail and beyond.

or

T1 = Easy terrian and UFO sightings

T4 - Pretty Easy Terrian : Covers all east and west coast terrian including all everest attempts.

T8 - AS$ HAT enough of this hiking crap, where is my car!!!!     Pronounced ( As Sat ) *The A$$ is silent*

T10 - Who the F%%% Said this was Easy Terrian?Huh!

T14 - Freaking Impossible What the F%^& Was I Thinking, Where is Jan? I'm Going to smack him! (this term will be used alot of I ever attempt that Pemi-loop)
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2010, 06:49:36 AM »

I've used WFSET many times on many hikes, just in my head and never out loud.
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surf88
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« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2010, 07:43:11 AM »

The rating system is not a bad idea, because it could be incorporated into a formula such as the AMC uses to better estimate time.  However the same section of trail would require a seperate rating system for descending, as well as ascending.  Since I;ve found that certain types of footing make ascending faster than say if it were just flat, but that same terrain may make descending slower than if it were just flat.

But... My original intent of this thread was to learn or create hiking jargon for specific types of terrain more so than rate the difficulty of terrain.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2010, 08:01:59 AM by surf88 » Logged

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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2010, 08:26:27 AM »

But... My original intent of this thread was to learn or create hiking jargon for specific types of terrain more so than rate the difficulty of terrain.

Bummer I started working on a rating system with photo references. Ha oh well. I'll try to think about the jargon ideas instead.
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surf88
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« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2010, 11:16:02 AM »

The best I could come up with for the type of terrain that made the descent frow lafayette towards Garfield so difficult is "wet loose cobble"
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stuckinjersey
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« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2010, 12:01:54 PM »

Here are some good ones. I think road signs can be overly descriptive sometimes. Can you tell it's a holiday weekend Friday and I'm bored.
Maybe a good sign for the Pemi Loop

I saw this sign right before I got lost hiking last time.

This hike is far too hard for you, plus there is the possibility of Wizard encounters.

Fear not, Campmor now sells this so you are covered for any Wizard topped mountains.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2010, 12:10:42 PM by stuckinjersey » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: July 02, 2010, 04:19:31 PM »

HAHAHA Wizard spottings are often had at summits in the summer time when you hike with me.
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Dsmith3232
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« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2010, 08:36:58 PM »

HAHAHA Wizard spottings are often had at summits in the summer time when you hike with me.


you mean Hobbit right not wizard.
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