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Author Topic: First Tele Setup  (Read 3045 times)
atruss
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« on: November 06, 2010, 05:57:10 PM »

Got my first Tele setup today at a local swap, I thought I made out pretty good.
(Not quite as good as Surf's deal)

I got a pair of BD Nunyos with BD 03 Bindings with Mid Stiff Cartridges



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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2010, 08:00:23 AM »

Great score!  And you thought there would be no tele gear at your local hill swap.  I searched for reviews of the Nunyo and found several positive: consensus is a good all-around ski- soft tip, snappy tail.  The 03's are a good neutral binding: perfect to start with.

Now for those boots...
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Tommy T
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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2010, 10:21:31 AM »

Now for those boots...

Especially with neutral bindings, if you ever intend to go steep or fast or if you may ever find yourself on an icy or crusty surface, I strongly recommend a stiffer boot -- like the T2x instead of the T3.  With a strong active binding like a Hammerhead you can use a softer boot and rely on the binding  more and that is what I used to recommend when stiff boots were uncomfortable, especially for climbing or touring.  With the new boots with perfect heat molded fit and very well engineered flex patterns and buckle adjustability, stiffer is the way to go for almost everything.

I started tele in '69 and my son joined the free heel crowd in '80 at age 10 after breaking his alpine skis and my almost never used alpine skis on the same bump in consecutive runs on Zoomer.  We both went from stiff boots to flexible boots and back to stiff. 

I've even gone stiffer on my board boots with heat molded linings and dual lacing system.

Tommy T.
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« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2010, 08:33:37 PM »

Tommy T.,
Sounds like stiff boots can be more versatile than softies.  How far can that idea go?  What do you think about using, say, a Scarpa T2X or T1 hooked to a light metal-edged BC ski with simple but beefy 3 pin bindings like the Voile 3 pins for low to medium angle thicketeering?  It would probably be a compromise setup, but it would save having to shell out for a second pair of boots. Would you just loosen the cuff buckles for up and cinch them for down? 

And what is the ski were a still light, but wider and with more shape?  Would the boot bellows provide enough energy transfer to the shovel to tele in moderate angle BC?

What do you think?
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Tommy T
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« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2010, 09:13:57 PM »

My feeling is that the resistance has to be there somewhere if you are going to be able to transfer energy to the ski -- edges or shovel.  The resistance can come from a stiff boot that transfers a lot of your body action even through a completely neutral binding (like skiing downhill in AT gear without locking the heel down -- a stiff boot makes that work while a soft boot and loose heel just leaves you flexing your ankles and nothing's happening).  Or, that resistance can come from an active tele binding that is tending to hold the heel down and is multiplying the forward weight shift when you raise the heel.  Although it doesn't feel that different to me, what happens is that you have to work harder to raise the heel with an active binding and that extra work that you are doing anyway makes up for the softer boot.

There also is real room to differ over what is a stiff boot.  It can stiff in forward lean or in edge control or both.  I think stiff edge control is needed in almost all alpine situations, regardless of binding design.  Going up or down. 

My soft boot/active binding preference is made in the context that I'm a middle of the road telemarker, so that all works pretty for me and I have a lot of choice as to how to go.  If you are a hard driving, 60 degree crust hot dog, you are going to want stiff boot, stiff ski and active bindings.  If you are just using tele gear for extra flotation on winter treks plus a little bonus of some easy back country downhill, you'll be happier with soft boot, soft ski and neutal bindings. 

By the way, I've said it before but this may the place to say it again.  If I were young and starting from scratch with todays choices and my present interests in back country terrain that boarders on extreme, I would go with durable A.T. equipment all the way.  When I started downhill skiing, I was coming in from a X country racing and coaching background and tele was a natural step.  When I graduated to Tucks, A.T. was delicate fussy stuff that was hard to find and apt not to last through a season.  Ramer was importing and selling A.T. set-ups and the military had an A.T. standard but the Army's stuff was clunky and Ramer's was funky.  (I'd say we started seeing real choices in practical A.T. in the early '90s.)

Of course, everybody here knows I'm on snowboard 90% of the time, in bounds or out. and I'm not really in tune with this year's (or maybe this decade's) ski gear.

Tommy T.
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« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2010, 06:47:06 AM »

Thanks, Tommy.  Always good to hear from someone with perspective that spans the development of gear and technique. 

I'll preempt the snickers towards my attempt at being delicate by saying that wisdom and expertise are earned by doing and then reflecting on that doing.  You started tele'n in '69, the year I was born, and have made more turns on more gear on more hills than most of us.  Thanks for entertaining our questions and sharing your insight.
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Tommy T
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2010, 11:03:40 PM »

  You started tele'n in '69, the year I was born, and have made more turns on more gear on more hills than most of us.  Thanks for entertaining our questions and sharing your insight.

I have found that the worst pick-up line in the mountains is this:  When asked by an attractive girl in her twenties "How long have you been snowboarding?" , I respond "Since before you were born."

Tommy T.
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atruss
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« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2010, 08:18:40 PM »

LOL, yeah that will bring in a catch !

Ok, I need insight on a garmont specific boot.

What boot would you guys recommend, one that I'll be able to find used, or discounted (Not VOODOOs, they are like 700 bucks....)

I guess I'm looking for a boot that's powerful enough to withstand what I will be throwing at it, from the learning stage, to the recreational stage in a BC setting.
I want to comfortably skin in them too.

I also need to buy the riser accessory for the bindings, they are not present currently.
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surf88
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« Reply #8 on: November 10, 2010, 03:20:02 PM »

I rented a pair of syner G 's by garmont last year, and really like them they were stiff enough to make alpine turns in most conditions.
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atruss
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« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2010, 10:00:49 PM »

I was looking at those, did you skin in them at all?

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« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2010, 11:31:18 AM »

No.  I did try to tour in my Garmont Garas that I had and they were a similar design.  Even with the BD 01' s that had a tour mode I found them to be too stiff to skin comfortably.
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atruss
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« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2010, 12:56:00 PM »

Thanks for the heads up, now I'm back to the "Drawing Board"

I want a boot that can be stiff enough to be able to carry me past my "learning" phase, and be able to skin without discomfort.
Any suggestions.

The way my boot hunt is going, I'm going to end up duct-taping my feet to the tele skis....
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