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Author Topic: Annual Ski and Snowboard Thing 2012/2013  (Read 6729 times)
Tommy T
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« Reply #45 on: January 25, 2013, 07:59:41 PM »

Pretty much on schedule, the weather is changing.   Valley pollution is not as bad today as it has been for a week.  National Weather Service is showing an interesting bunch of weather systems coming in from: (i) the Pacific/Southern California route with lots of moisture which will be met by: (ii) a line of cold fronts and troughs sliding out of south-west Canada and then, toward the end of the week: (iii) a sizeable low sliding down from the Gulf of Alaska. 

Snow is forecast starting tonight at high elevations and continuing through the coming week.  Daytime highs will be in the freezing range.  By the end of the week the new snow will be measured in feet and most of it will be above 7000'.  (Roughly and approximately speaking, Canyons runs from 7000 to 10,000 and S'Bird is 8000 to 11,000.)

Good times in the mountians are comin' back with exactly three months from today left in our SLC time!

Tommy T.
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« Reply #46 on: January 31, 2013, 06:20:10 PM »

After a fairly long run of serious winter weather both in the mountains and in town, we got the pay off with a beautiful day in both.  In town the smog is gone with the wind and temps are above freezing so we're seeing concrete in the driveway for first time in about 10 days.  In mountains . . .

Snowbird got the best snow but Little Cottonwood is chains or 4WD only.  Yesterday, they closed the road to all traffic at 3:30 pm -- that's troublesome and the possibility makes me choose not to go there when that is possible.

Canyons "only" got about 2 feet in the last few days and, other than a little wind and off and on flat light, today was a good day with temps in the 20s and the crowds, as usual, just weren't.  Avi center said that East side slopes between 7000 and 1000 feet were the most dangerous and that hits some good open areas along the ridges at Canyons where we heard avi control all day.  

So it was a tree day.  Nine runs on lifts that run from over 1500 to over 1700 foot vertical gave me eight off-piste runs in the trees that totalled about 8000 vertical feet of actual in-the-trees-time in two different sets of trees that had deep!, wind deposited snow that had seen only a few lines before mine and lots of running room. I made no repeats, so every run but the first (the groomer that got me over to the good chairs) had some substantial A-1 quality work.

This was the kind of day that we come to the mountains to enjoy.  Over the years that we've been doing this, my taste for turning where nobody else has turned has begun to outweight my taste for tough, technical challenges.  I virutally never make virgin turns at J'Hole -- if somebody hasn't already done that line, it probably cliffs out.  

I wonder if this means that I am maturing or something wierd like that . . .

?
?

Tommy T.

(I don't know -- there are almost no cornices in the Wasatch and those that form are unstable and short lived.  I think I want to go to A-Basin and log some natural air-time instead of park jumps.  Out of my 98 areas,  I can't think of many lift served areas other that A-Basin with good, accessible cornices  --  Squaw Valley has some nice ones on the ridge up Granite Peak; Kirkwood has "The Wave;"  and there are always a few, irregular shaped ones at Brek's Peak 8, but those are above rocks and kinda scary.)

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(Of course, not all cornices are created equal:



Those two are on the French Ridge of Mt Huntington in the Alaska Range and instead of jumping them, we tunneled into the first one and made a snow cave which was our assault camp.  1982, as I recall.)

  

« Last Edit: January 31, 2013, 11:09:07 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #47 on: February 01, 2013, 08:30:51 PM »

From the Utah Avi Center, today, February 1, 2013:

For such "upside down" snow, the riding conditions were not so bad yesterday with about 8 inches of creamy, very dense, graupel snow on the surface. It fell on light powder snow, so it feels a bit punchy for old-schoolers like me who prefer light, narrower skis. Snowmobiling conditions remain supportable. The stratus, mountain-top clouds and high wind from yesterday will thankfully transition into mostly sunny with light winds today with continued pleasant temperatures.

So I got to experience an Avi Center observation first hand. Yesterday riding in trees I spent most of my time making easy in a very smooth untracted snow surface.  But!  If I did sit down, as I did once in a while for whatever reason -- to contemplate the beauty of the mountains, to participate in the solitude of the trees, or (most often), to get back up after I buried the nose or over-checked on an edge -- my arm would go in past the elbow when I tried to push back up.  Every time I went down, I scootched over to a tree and pulled myself back to vertical.  There just wasn't anything solid to push against down in the snow pack.

Tommy T.

(Today was dedicated to entertaining my wife on nicely prepped blue groomers on a mostly sunny day with easy temperatures (high 20's) and gentle winds (single digits.  Not much story to tell, just good companionship and a nice meal on the way back home with catfish sandwich on fresh bun with "creole peppers" and various sauces.  Linda went for the catfish tacos with mild sweet corn salsa.  Latter Day Stout on draft for both of us.) 
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« Reply #48 on: February 02, 2013, 07:39:36 PM »

Wow!  Nearly cloudless sky two feet of snow during the week and temps in the high twenties up on the hill.  First good week-end day in a couple of weeks and Canyons was packed at the main bases and around the popular lifts.  So it was get up high as quickly as possible and hike higher.



This is Square Top.  Summit is up around 9900' ASL.  Reaching it requires riding the 9990 chair (minimum 3 rides to get up there) and hiking about 180' of vert to the true 9,990' ASL summit of the ridge that separates Canyons (and the rest of Park City) from Big Cottonwood Canyon with its areas, Brighton and Solitude.   The 9990 summit is up and out of the picture to the left.  Area boundary comes straight down the fall line from the low point on the ridge -  picture left is in bounds, picture right is out.That low point is about 370 feet below the 9990 summit but the only legal way to get over to Square Top is to climb 9990, go through the gate at its summit and descend the back side of the ridge and angle over to the saddle.  (That's not a penalty -- that back side is usually much nicer riding than the more heavily traveled in-bound front.)  At the low point you start climbing again and either go all the way to the top or drop in where ever it looks nice and without too many lines.

The two arrows mark the two lines that I took today.   They each gave me about 1000 foot drop on the open face, followed by about 500 more through open aspens to a collector trail and another 500 on a groomer back to the most convenient lift.   That takes you up 1200' then ride down to the 9990 lift, up to the hike and do it again.  Do that twice and  its a decent workout in some really pretty terrain.

Yes sir, this is definitely skiing the American West at its best.  I really think that Canyons offers some great, non-extreme (J'Hole for that) out-of-bounds.  Only drawack is that the Wasatch is avalanche prone.  I read the reports everyday, whether I'm going out or not; I dig a pit now and then;  keep track of what exposures I'm on; pay attention to temperature; and enjoy every second that I get.  Add lots of good beer, and plenty of coffee . . .

Well, life's pretty good this week.

Tommy T.

(Clarification:  9990' ASL is the high of that part of the ridge that is within bounds at Canyons.  The are a few points on the ridge over its entire length that are higher.)
« Last Edit: February 02, 2013, 08:07:08 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #49 on: February 04, 2013, 11:00:22 PM »

Well, the IceBerg,  ooops, I mean Snowbird is in pretty bad shape.  Groomers are solid to point of being just plain unpleasant at best.  Off piste access routes like the Cirque Traverse are showing a lot a lot of rock, drop below the rock and try to traverse and it's a lot of brush.  All the classic lines up around Great Scott are closed.  'Bird side of the Baldy summit is almost completely snow-free for at least a couple of hundred feet and there is a very little snow on the rock the rest of the way down to the groomers in the Cirque.   The Gad Chutes have lots of rock showing.  The Wilbere areas have less rock but still require constant scanning of the surface for little dark spots that hide a big base gouge. (Fortuately, my Canyons pass gives me a "Gold" level tune, which includes base work, for $35.)   The ridges across the canyon are bare as are all the high points looking down-canyon.  Possiblity of decent snow for the coming week-end, so I'll take another look next Monday.

Besides the snow not being close to good, the crowd did not seem to include the usual top skier/rider, hard-core, fall-line divers that usually dominate the upper parts of the area.  It was all Californians out for an extended week-end and guys from Wisconsin on their first trip West asking what the big deal about the Wasatch is all about because they've got better snow at home.

I ought to get paid.  I helped the sole liftie at the top of the Baldy Lift when the little kid's mother hopped off the chair while the kid went around the wheel, caught and lost one ski and in the process fell out of the chair and slid off the downside of the unloading platform.  That stopped the lift so I jumped off, dumped my board and went over the edge after him just as the liftie corralled the loose ski and started for the kid.  I yelled at him "I'm an experienced mountaineer and a Wilderness First Responder.  I won't make it worse."   The kid wasn't old enough to be really scared.  The liftie got the loose ski and I kicked in just below the kid and got the other ski off his foot and turned him around aimed up hill.  By then the liftie had one of his arms and led him up to his mom while I played goalee just below him in case he leaned in and broke out of a foot placement.  I was doing the grandfather bit "Boy, you handled that just right.  You're really cool in an emergency.  That could have been a bad fall, but you did just the right things."  I really don't remember the mother thanking either one of us.  

One run later, I was going down the Mineral Basin headwall starting right at the Little Cloud lift top and angling skier's right to give myself a longer run.  I saw two skiers down in the snow quite a ways down and I just kept an eye them.  One of them was moving skis around and other was sort of lying down on the snow.  They weren't making any progress, so I went close and shouted out that I had tools and some repair supplies -- then I saw the blood and added "and I'm a Wilderness First Responder with an expired certification."  The guy on the snow had face planted on a solid crust and was bleeding from the mouth. The guy was bleeding from a big ruptured blood blister inside the upper lip -- no gash and no pulsing blood so I suggest packing it with snow to slow bleeding and to remove the snow right away if it went numb.  He complained about soreness in his back, so I checked hands and feet for movement and feeling  and told him that I couldn't clear the central portion of the spine but the two most common regions of spinal chord pinching seemed to be ok and I suspected that the pain was from a stressed lat. instead of the spine.  He had to decide how bad it was -- I could get patrol or he could ski it off or he could ski down to the lift and decide it was really bad and call for help from there (which is the choice he elected to make).  His buddy and I got him standing up and on skis; he thought he could make it down to the lift; he had his buddy with him so I left them.  On my ride up, I watched as they made slow but steady progress down toward the closest facilities.

The snow was pretty lame, but at least the day had it's interesting moments.

On the way home, I stopped at an Einstein's Bagel shop for a mid-afternoon snack.  I had just sat down when a young woman with a big baby carrier in one hand and a sizeable hand bag across the other shoulder stopped at the coffee machine and filled a cup.  Just as she got the top on, the counter help brought the paper sack with her purchase over.  I stood up and took the sack and took coffee cup from her hand and said, "I'll get these -- you get your baby and we'll get this all out to your car."  She said that I didn't need to and I said "Yes, I do.  I'm a grandfather with six grandkids and if you were my daughter I would hope that someone would help."   I got a nice smile for that one which was all I wanted anyway.

Tommy T.

« Last Edit: February 05, 2013, 02:52:08 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #50 on: February 08, 2013, 05:17:57 PM »

Six months of snowboarding at Canyons Resort and I am just begining to explore the Peak 5 area.  

Peak 5 is remote and barely developed.  To reach the top of Peak 5 from the parking lot requires a minimum of 3 lifts; I use 5 to avoid a walk across a flat connector section near the helicopter evacuation landing spot and another walk across a slightly uphill field between 9990 and the Peak 5 chair.  Basically, the Peak 5 lift provides an inconvenient way to the far right side of the area and the fairly nice Cloud Dine restaurant -- local statement is that the existence of the Peak 5 chair allowed 173 more million dollar ski-in/ski/out building lots to be sold by Les Orten.

It does, however, have a nice treed, steep slope with occassional open shots and a couple of overlapping cliff bands.   Nobody goes over there  -- Last year, I skied the trees there only a few times and only once out of bounds.  This year I noticed the gate to the out-of-bounds and started using it.

This is a Google Earth snip showing the tree covered side of the ridge abvove the lift:




The lift top is at about 9,300 and the high point of my hikes is around 9,600.  I made three hkes up it yesterday.  All three runs were in loose, untracked snow through reasonable woods (first hike), route finding through overlapping cliffs (second hike) and from the marked high point (third hike) through the trees into what is now an open snow field.  The first two runs had found plenty of deep snow and I was throwing some loose stuff when I had enough open room for some speed.  On the third hike, I was intending to go to the limit of the trees on the ridge make the whole run in the open.  However, as the slope on the ridge got steeper, I was progressively penetrating deeper with each step and finally I straped on and headed down.  The short shot through the trees was steep and deep and a real delight.  Before heading out into the open, I probed the snow and went all the way to the ground with no resistence -- which was troubling. I did a rough pit and found the ground was about 20" down and the snow was facets all the way -- which was much more troubling.  As a consequence, I did not ride out into the open slope but stayed in the trees and paralleled the descending junction of trees and open slope until I was well down into 20 degree terrain.  That made a good set of runs and I still had something between 3 and 5 lifts to get back.  

At a Patrol shack I reported the results of my little pit and, as always, they logged the information and my name.  I asked about the log.  I was told that it would be reviewed before tomorrow's sweeps.  Patrollers and supervisers begin to recognize names that are regular reporters and good observers and those reports will be taken into account in planning where the sweepers go and what they do.

I asked if they knew me and how.  The guy said that most of them knew of me but he didn't know how the control crews evaluated my reports.

Tommy T.  


« Last Edit: February 14, 2013, 12:43:23 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #51 on: February 12, 2013, 02:42:23 PM »

Angie and her current beau (this one may, finally, be the real thing) stayed with us for four days and, as usual, that leaves both me and my wife in a good mood.   Because the beau had only snowboarded once and Angie had never ridden Sundance, we headed down there again for a day of easy fun in nice country.  Angie and Linda headed up the hill and Paul and I had a little lesson time.  His level was self-reported to me as "I can do a falling leaf facing out but I'm pretty shaky facing in."  By mid-afternoon, we took him to the top and rode down blue all the way, including a little dip into some shallow Wasatch powder and a section of narrow connector trail.  He was linking C's and adjusting his radius and relation to the fall line with no trouble.  Untrained at downhill sports, he is a mountaineer and outdoorsman -- deputy director of interpretation at Yosemite -- fit and under 40.  I seem to be a gifted teacher and I like to give a lesson once in a while and I am particularly satisfied that Angie was pleased with the results.   (Angie herself remains my best student ever and she seems to think that I am magic, which is fine with me, given the way that I feel about her.)  They were taking pictures and will send me any that are worthwhile.  If there are any nice shots of Sundance,  I'll follow-up with a post some of them.

Then we went out for my birthday dinner (a day early) at what Linda and I think may be the City's best seafood resturaunt.  On my birthday, I had a rehearsal for Music Man and came home to find champagne and my favorite cake (angelfood with no icing) covered with 70 candles.

Now everybody is gone again and  I'm sending thank-you notes and getting back up to date on the avi forecasts and the new snow totals at the resorts.  Tomorrow looks like the start of several days of an-inch-a-day-snow in mild and gentle conditions.  That's not going to restore virginity to the bowls, but it might be exactly what Snowbird needs to get Mineral Basin back in shape.

Linda and my daughter had organized an e-mail campaign and I received 70th birthday greetings from more than 115 people. It's kind of funny that I am the youngest living graduate in my high school class and so I was last to reach 70.  However, it seems that I will be the first to hit our 50th wedding anniversary next January.

Tommy T.
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« Reply #52 on: February 17, 2013, 02:44:47 PM »

Sometimes I think that guys and girls are different.   Roll Eyes

Angie sent us 16 pictures of the birthday cake  --  no snowboarding or mountain shots.

The 70 candle cake:



The iminent fire hazard:



And the near conflagration resulting from adding oxygen to fire:



Tommy T.



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« Reply #53 on: February 18, 2013, 06:02:40 PM »

It is time for more snow to fall in the Wasatch.  Top of Baldy on the S'Bird side is just plain bare down to the rock for several hundred feet. The lower trails of Baldy down into the Peruvian Gulch are really thin with lots of rock and brush, even on the lines that are on the map.  In Mineral Basin, the Chamonix area is closed but it is hardly necessary to have signs because there is nothing inviting up there right now.

At Canyons, important East facing exposures are nearly bare, groomers are getting really solid from being overworked and the snow in wonderful trees is "firm" to say the least. 

A foot of snow will fix most of the terrain at Canyons and 18" will put S'Bird back on the map.

We're expecting a few inches mid-week and the Avi Center is pretty excited about a big system that should move in over the coming week-end.

(There is always some good news on the hills -- just have to be not too selective -- for example, the new jump park has been very slow snow and I have had a lot of difficulty clearing the landing tables.  I've been bypassing the first jump in order to build enough speed to clear the second.  Today, I did three in a row twice!)

Tommy T.
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« Reply #54 on: February 23, 2013, 11:18:14 PM »

Avy class sponsored by the Friends of the Utah Avalanche Center started with an indoor session in the city on Thursday and continued today with 8 hours in and around Brighton.  I have attended avalanche training previously and have certificates from Ski Patrol and from the National Forest Service.  Still, it is something that needs updating from time to time because techniques do get refined, tools and resources develop and it just makes sense to get an occassional reminder about the little details that may have been forgotten.  This course was not a full Avy I certification course, but was sort of an intro to avy issues for first timers -- actually just what I needed for a reminder and an update.

It was a well timed program in that the Wasatch snow pack is currently quite problematical and today saw the first big effects of a week of unsettled weather that is moving in and around this area.  The Center had put together a good program, dividing about 36 students into four groups, each with a career avalanche forcaster and an experienced Wasatch back-country skier.  By prior assignment, I was in the travel disadvantaged group consisting of a couple of snowshoers, a couple of split boarders, a couple of skiers trying skins on tele or AT equipment for the first time, and another snowboarder and me with snowshoes for the uphill.

I learned of a new refinement to strategic shoveling and I fixed a problem with how I was doing the final, close-in beacon search and I was able to help the instructor with the digging of his demonstration snow-pit.   (Ski Patrol really needs consistent reports from the avy patrol that is out checking conditions every morning -- my course at Taos emphasized the difference between results to be used by you and your buddy when choosing a line and results to be reported to a regional authority and published for use by a wide audience.)

Here's our pit, with the results of a compression test (a clean break of a solid slab sitting on late January facets about 2 feet down in the snow pack) and my blue shovel with a Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center sticker wrapped around the handle.



(As a sobering aside, our instructor watched two friends go down for good in a slide last year.  He's talking about it in public, hoping that some good will come from an unfortunate example and, probably, working out some of his own feelings about it.)

Most of our group,



about 50-50 male and female.  (Things are better in the backcountry than used to be the case.  Not only are there more women but, probably because there are more women, the guys seem to be taking more showers than we used to.)  

The storm got worse and worse during the day.  The drive down Big Cottonwood Canyon at 5pm was on chains at 15 mph.  I saw four cars off the road. Internet shows that Little Cottonwood was closed to uphill traffic this afternoon.



(Fortunately there was beer at home so we didn't have to get out to go to a pub.)

Tommy T.
« Last Edit: February 24, 2013, 06:21:19 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #55 on: February 24, 2013, 03:09:12 PM »

Happy Birthday ! (Belated)
Glad its snowing out there again, SB and the rest sounds like they were hurting for a while?
Hope things shape up.

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« Reply #56 on: February 24, 2013, 06:37:58 PM »

Glad its snowing out there again, SB and the rest sounds like they were hurting for a while?
Hope things shape up.

That snowpit in the prior photo is about 1' short of the ground because we ran into number of low rock features that would have messed up things like compression tests if we had gone all the way down.  So after we did the column tests, we dug on down to ground at one spot and found the facet layer that I had seen at Canyons on Peak 5 earlier in the week.  But you can see that we are looking at five or six feet on snow on the ground at Brighton.  The problem at S'Brd is that all the good stuff up on Baldy and the ridges has been suffering from a lot of hot sun and a lot of high winds.

S'Brd is showing around 17" for the storm that ended early this morning and a good day on Monday with highs in the 20's, ridge winds in the teens, and some sunshine.  Then the next snow event is expected on Tuesday and Wednesday.  Linda and I will probably head up there for the 9:00 openning in the morning.


Tommy T.


« Last Edit: March 02, 2013, 06:46:27 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #57 on: February 26, 2013, 12:21:51 AM »

Linda and I got in a good session at S'Brd, mostly on or near the groomers on the Gad side, especially Bananas and Election -- Linda's two favorite blues -- with me nipping in and out of the trees along the sides.  A Monday and and an early start gave us nice corduroy on a foot or more of new snow that had only been groomed once.  We left about 1:00pm and headed down, only to be stopped for quite a while by the road being blocked by emergency vehicles supporting a helicopter evacuation of an injured snowboarder from the Y Chute area, down canyon on the South side.  Injured around 9:30am, with possible broken legs and pelvis after what sounds like a blind jump in a rock lined gully, the helicopter got him out and off to the hospital around 2:00pm.  Word was that he was conscious but in a lot of pain.

When we did get out, we drove up to the Silver Fork Lodge in Big Cottonwood, near Solitude, which is a really atmospheric little lodge with a great menu well executed.  In March of last year, my son and I made a back country run down a valley called Bear Trap and came out near the lodge where, as planned, we had lunch while my wife drove up to collect us.  By way of thanks, I promised her a dinner there.  I finally paid off today and she was well satisfied.  (Always a good thing.)

Tommy T.


Update: The rider was Alex Gavic who was involved in making a video of a snowboard run in one of the highly technical gullies in Y Chute -- a hike-to area near the bottom of Little Cottonwood.  The report from a news source that has seen the raw video is that he jumped off of a snow covered rock and crash landed on a lower one.  Spinal injuries are reported in today's press.  Alex appears to be a regular around the Wasatch and has some videos up on the web that first date from the 08-09 season when he looks like a pretty good teenage boarder with some skill in the air. Reports indicate that he was wearing a helmet, a spine guard and a butt protector.  The initial impact may have been right between the spine and butt gear.  This sounds like a unfortunate assumed risk kind of accident that has happened to an informed and capable boarder who knew the risks, took them into account and just had the dice come up wrong.  Hospital report is that his condition is stable but the degree of damage has not been discussed.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2013, 01:50:05 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #58 on: February 27, 2013, 05:19:30 PM »

There is very, very little opportunity to claim a "find" at SnowBird.  The quality and the commitment of the top locals is comparable to that of Jackson Hole.  The bordering backcountry is known almost as well as the in-bounds side.  

Nevertheless, there is still an occassional niche run -- a conspiracy of conditions, obscurity, low return on effort and inability to expand the run into a major adventure -- that saves 500 feet of beautiful snow, just out of bounds, for the duffer explorer to slide into, almost by mistake.

Conditions today had the potential of being very good.  S'Brd picked up about 17 inches from a combination of the Saturday storm that tormented our Avi course and 10 inches of new over the last 2 days. The wind was down, temps were in single digits, and the sky was almost cloudless. The crowd was low -- people committed to stealling a day from work stole it on Monday and there is no big vacatoin break this week.  

I laid in 4 runs off the Gad2, playing off of the Red Lens and Tiger Tail lines and then went over to Mineral Basin to satisfy a request from Linda that I report on the conditions of the groomers there.   Then I did it:

The Baldy Lift goes up to the low point on the ridge the seperates S'Brd and Alta.  All the way to skier's left is an avalanche control rope just outside the route named "Bird's Nest."  The gates were open.  Once, through the gate, Ski Patrol Gully is the last trail before the boundary to the left. The slope between the Avi rope and SPG is often a tempting open area with few tracks, and such was the case today.    Above SPG, out-of-bounds further to the skier's left, are the Sugar Cliffs, below which is a long, slanted, open snowfield that is rarely tracked. It heads down away from Mineral Basin lifts, eventually coming out in about 4 miles at a trail head at American Forks.  Mineral Basin drains in that direction down and the slope parallels the drainage and an old mining road which is used for backcountry access from American Forks and for snow-cat tours out of SnowBird.

Today, it was untracked. I knew the price and decided to pay it for powder; I crossed SPG -- not a single track on the other side; I crossed boundary rope.  I traversed, holding as much altitude as I could and still move in the deep, fine snow.  At a point where I was perhaps 300 feet above the bottom of the slope, I stopped for a minute to enjoy being out of sight of the area and deep in the silence of winter mountains.   And, then, I pointed the board down-hill.

28 big, open sweepers in untouched Wasatch powder, swinging back and forth, down a treeless open slope of, maybe, 25 degrees -- almost the dream of lifetime.  The feel was like that of standing on top of McKinley or pulling over the last move on a free climb of El Cap.   I didn't time it or mark the altitude.  I suspect that each turn took 5 seconds and there could have been a couple more secs. between each turn  --  three minutes at most.  Three minutes of memory that, I hope, will never fade.

As I expected, the snow-cat track was well packed, so I was wading through 10 inches of new, not the entire 160 inch base.  I tied a line on the board and towed it, leaving my hands free to do important things like continually wiping my nose, and, in less than 20 minutes of easy going, I was back at the Mineral Basin Lift.  Then, over the ridge to Road to Provo, Last Choice to the Rasta Chutes, hold speed for the flat spot by Little Cloud and into Black Forest, and thence back to my car at Creekside.

A beer and a humus wrap; a quick report for BCA; and now. . .

A nap.

Tommy T.

 

I knew the price; it was a bargain.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2013, 08:16:15 PM by Tommy T » Logged

Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.
                                                                             -- Pablo Picasso
Tommy T
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« Reply #59 on: March 07, 2013, 10:07:57 PM »

A nice string of good days and today was warm and dropping a little bit of wet snow.  

So we had our favorite breakfast (eggs benedict with crab meat and a fruit cup) at one of our favorite breakfast haunts (Eggs and the City) and followed up with a late lunch at a Frida Kahlo themed Mexican restraunt whose weird hours had frustrated our attempts twice previously.

My meal was an outstanding turkey breast tamale in a spicy mole' sauce and a bottle of :



That's another one of those pint and a half bottles of 11.4 proof, small batch, beers that each of the many local breweries have as one of their trademarks.  This one is from the Epic Brewery and is a coffee/stout in the Imperial Russian style.  Opaque, jet black with a dark and strong head, it was served in a chilled bottle and did not quite measure up to the Squatter's cask cured, hand pulled, Imperial Russian served at the Squatter's Brew Pub at cellar temperature last year.  

Nevertheless, and although I like some things about Snowbird and continue to find new challenges at Canyons almost every day that I am there, the reason for repeating out here this year is the attractions of Salt Lake City rather than mountains standing alone.  Eggs Benedict with crab meat and Big Bad Baptist at Frida's are examples that are hard to duplicate in the Big Thicket in Deep East Texas.

Tommy T.  
« Last Edit: March 07, 2013, 10:17:49 PM by Tommy T » Logged

Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.
                                                                             -- Pablo Picasso
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