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Author Topic: IT'S OVER: N0 MORE ANNUAL SKI AND SNOWBOARD THINGS!!  (Read 1281 times)
Tommy T
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« on: April 06, 2013, 05:35:51 PM »

We put in an offer on a house in SLC and it has been accepted.

I'll be on great snow all winter every winter until I die, but there aren't going to be many new stories after this one.

Someday there'll be a week up at Fernie and we'll be within week-ending range of Aspen/Snowmass, but it's pretty much going to convert from an annual adventure to an annual routine.

I keep my daily log on an Excel spread sheet -- I can't imagine turning BCA accounts into nothing but lists of vert and and number of days.

Looks like No. 100 is going to wait till next winter (unless I ski something in Iceland this summer).    I'll post an account and a review when that happens.

Tommy T.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2013, 10:25:58 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2013, 06:26:33 AM »

Not a bad place to retire to.  At least we'll all know where to find you if we are ever in the area.
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Tommy T
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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2013, 08:20:22 PM »

Not a bad place to retire to.  At least we'll all know where to find you if we are ever in the area.

For the time being, retirement stays in Texas where there are no state income taxes.  My whole portfolio is built around that fact and letting my legal residency slip over to Utah would be fairly expensive.  (The markets are such that this would be a very bad time to restructure my holdings.  As investments turn over in the natural course of business, I'll probably gradually readjust to a Utah friendly set of instruments.  Then, when our age brings on such health problems that we would rather be closer than an hour from our doctors and an hour and a half from the good hospitals in Houston, we might go Utah full time and to that end we are not unaware that our SLC house will be quite close to excellent SLC health care.)

So, Utah will see us in the winter months  and maybe one or two in the summer when our part of Texas can be really, really hot and humid. We will keep the time in Utah to less than six months each year.  It'll also be a spot where our son and daughter can base for a Western vacation now and then.  We tentatively plan to garage (the house comes with a garage on a city plowed alley) a car as well as our winter gear in SLC and then fly back and forth from Houston.

Tommy T.
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Tommy T
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2013, 07:25:26 PM »

 
Closed on the house in SLC yesterday and the realtor took us to the Bohemian Grill to celebrate. I love all the SLC brew pubs and this newly discovered piece may be the best so far. I'm a dark beer drinker and the Bohemian's Cherny Bock is a wonderful, dark and smooth, brew with a creamy, long-lasting head, no bitterness and just a touch of sweet in the after-taste. In other words, nearly perfect. All four dinners were well prepared and true to the Central European style -- none of us left a crumb on the plates.

Ambience was dark, reasonably quiet, warm and cozy. Interior was suggestive of an alpine lodge with dark half log treatment on the walls, brightened a bit by whimsical take-offs on "little Swiss boy" style prints.
We will go back for more!

Oh! The house:



About 1900 sq. ft.; built in 1913 -- an even century old; all the rooms on one floor (good for septagenarians) with a 2/3rds basement holding up to date heating and cooling systems and ample storage space.

Present owner is responsible for repairing the chimney and we'll upgrade the porch steps and floor.  They are taking care of some "safety problems" concerning the basement stairs and we're upgrading the garage to provide secure storage for a dedicated SLC car.  It has been beautifully renovated inside, although we are buying it unfurnished and will provide all the furniture and stuff on a trip out this summer.



Tommy T.
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Tommy T
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« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2013, 08:42:53 AM »

This is an older picture of the outside giving a better sense of how it sits on the property.  As shown above, it's been repainted and has a new roof, but this is a good idea of its settting and "cuteness" factor.



To be so close to the urban environment of SLC, it's really pretty well set.

Tommy T.
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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2013, 06:45:13 AM »

Nice.  That's a lot more green grass and trees than you normally see in the SLC area.  The lack of lush green like we have here in new England is one of the things that make me the most homesick when I travel out there in the summer. Sometimes I'll take a ride up to Provo canyon just to enjoy the green vegetation.
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« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2013, 01:13:04 PM »

Nice.  That's a lot more green grass and trees than you normally see in the SLC area.  The lack of lush green like we have here in new England is one of the things that make me the most homesick when I travel out there in the summer. Sometimes I'll take a ride up to Provo canyon just to enjoy the green vegetation.

Thanks.  I think that there is a lot of nice landscaping up in the Avenues area with all the $1,000,000 Victorian homes, but areas like Sugar House are pretty much urban black-top jungles.  The new subdivisions tend to denude the landscape and then crowd it with mega-size, look-alike trophy houses.  And, not all neighborhoods are places that we would want to live.  Then, out-of-town, the suburbs that spread out to the SW of the city are really grim dessert at the low point of the terrain and thus maximally subject to the pollution problems.  The developments to the East, up I-80, are at higher altitude and are really unattractive and devoid of trees, grass, cactus or anything else green.

We looked at a lot of stuff that we didn't like and at a lot more that we did like but for which we couldn't justify the price in terms of a secondary residence.  

Destiny was at work with this one.  At about 2pm one afternoon, a young woman relator knocked on our door and asked Linda if she knew anyone who was interested in buying a house.  (That was weird since we are renting in an old and established neighborhood of large, very well kept Victorians, not especially close to and not near the price range of the one we bought.)  The woman had an open-house scheduled for 6pm.  I got home at about 3pm from a short day of Spring conditions.  We called the woman and arranged to see the house at 4pm.  I liked the location and Linda thought the interior was just what a little vacation house for two eldery people ought to be.  There was an outstanding offer on the house about $20,000 below the asking price.  The owners had countered with a proposal half-way in between and had set 6pm as the dead-line to accept.  On the spot, at 5pm, we offered the original asking price in a cash transaction (no delay for bank approval needed) and the woman cancelled the open-house -- either the original bidders would accept the counter-offer before 6pm or the owners would get their asking price from us.  We waited with the relator until 6 pm and it was ours.

(The poppy mural on the wall is an interesting coincidence.  In the first house that Linda and I owned, we had one of her students paint a van Gogh style sunflower mural on our living room wall.  In our second house, we had a wall-paper mural of the Lake Louise area, and just at the end of last year our son had a jungle-like mural of vines painted in his entrance foyer and up the stairway to the second floor.  The relator had warned us that the interior decoration was "a bit eccentric."  But when we walked into the living room and saw the poppies I said "Mon Deiu; ces't moi!!!"  and that was pretty much the extent of our negotiations.

Tommy T.


« Last Edit: May 19, 2014, 09:27:16 AM by Tommy T » Logged

Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.
                                                                             -- Pablo Picasso
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