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Author Topic: Snowboarding 2013/14 -- Observations on Park City and Brighton  (Read 5158 times)
Tommy T
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« Reply #45 on: April 11, 2014, 05:53:21 PM »

Wow!  I ordered on April 8th at sale prices and opted for the free shipping. Smiley

The order arrived today, April 11th. Shocked

A correction to the edge discussion -- the board has smooth, sharp edges, not the new age wavy stuff.  I'm happy with that.

EVO included a couple of stickers in the package and I was happy enough about the speed of delivery that I went to put one on the tail gate of my van . . .

There was already one there.  (Well, it's not just age, I mean, there are a lot of stickers back there.)

Tommy T.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2014, 10:34:23 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #46 on: April 13, 2014, 10:42:16 AM »

So, today starts the last week of the season for a lot of the areas.  Both Brighton and Park City will have their last day next Sunday.  Brighton and Alta are still officially carrying bases of over 100 inches, but yesterday was a nasty day of riding my new board on frozen snow.  The groomers were frozen wash boards and off-pist is was frozen ruts, roots and rocks.  By Noon, when I left to play a concert in the Temple Square complex, the semi-thaw line where the groomers were becoming a bit more friendly was right around 9,000 feet.  Suffice it to say, the morning was a pretty rigorous test for how the new NeverSummer SL behaves in crap.  (In fact, it does very well -- rides a lot like my '09 model except that the response seems to be quicker and on big, sweeper style turns, the turn radius can be easily adjusted by lean angle without any specific effort to change direction with a little skid or aggressive weight shifts.  (Obviously, from the above description of the day, you can guess that I haven't made any of the critical tests in either deep powder or steep chutes -- those may actually wait until next season.)

OK.  Bad on me.  The first moment on the new board at the top of the hill was bad and embarassing.  Everybody already knows that I'm almost human, so I'll tell the story.

Arrive at the area just before 9am, park in the first row, right at the bottom of the Crest Express lift.  Ride to the top with a woman patrol and, as usual, pump her for maximum info and add a little braggado to compensate for a 40 year age difference.  At the top, I stand up; start moving down the gentle unload ramp; set my free, rear, foot between the bindings and push back a bit with the toes to start an simple and slow turn to a stop.  My toe slips off the back side of the board and I fall face down in the middle of the un-load area.  Major embarassment, but I pop up quickly, take one good shove in show and set my free foot back on the board -- and fall again.  At this point,  patroller warns me that most trails off the Crest are at least somewhat difficult and the perhaps I should try a less demanding lift for the next run, if, in fact, I make it safely down.  I blame the problem on a bit of early morning stiffness, old age slow starter reflexes and some other bull.  I look down to fasten the rear binding and realize THE NEW BOARD HAS NO STOMP PAD.  I've been putting a wet boot sole down on polished, virgin P-tex.

I usually outfit my boards with TWO stomp pads, one with a lot of little bumps goes right next to the rear binding and is for control in situations like unloading, the other has a more agressive surface (large bumps or ridges) and is used to clean snow off the boot sole to allow easy entry to the binding.  

First ride went straight to retail shop for a quick purchase of two of the only choice of inadequate pads that were still in stock.  Putting them on cold and wet wasn't the best of tests and one fell off on the first use -- the other survived the morning and was replaced with the right stuff on the way home at a real snowboard shop.

I really think that new board is going to be great but a complete review of it and the Flow rear entry bindings will have to wait.

Tommy T.
« Last Edit: May 03, 2014, 12:44:42 PM by Tommy T » Logged

Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.
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« Reply #47 on: April 14, 2014, 06:36:51 PM »

I've got a few days on snow left in the season, but today I finished my tax preparation and, one day early, electronicaly filed everyting that I had to file, paying for 2013 and estimating for 2014 and requesting an extension on my 2013 filing  until October 15.  (I have to request an extension every year because some on my income is foreign based and taxes are paid in the country of origin -- those taxes are deductable from the taxes that are due to the U.S. on that income and the amounts aren't known until later in the year.  I don't have any direct foreign investments.  My Boston law firm has offices in and income from England, Europe, China, Japan and S. Korea -- so the taxes on my pay as Of Counsel to the firm (that's what we call retired lawyers and how we get our retirement cash flow -- actually the series of payments that most people would call "pension" is the deferred rationing out of my equity interest in the firm) is not finally determined until about August of the following year.  

So, I've got a little time and will start a couple of wrap-up posts.

PARK CITY MOUNTAIN RESORT

OK!  It's number 3 on my personal favorites list for my own mountain destination for lift served snowboarding.  It follows Jackson Hole and Big Sky which jostle back and forth between first and second place depending on which one I most recently visited.  It displaces Squaw Valley in that position.  It's number 3 on my personal favorites list for a destination resort for families or groups with a bunch of skiers and boarders of different objectives and abilities. It follows Big Sky which is my number 1 in that spot and the generallized "North end of Lake Tahoe" region which is number 2.

First negatives, let's get them out of the way:

Complicated terrain, confusing lift system and difficult trail map can make it a nightmare for less skilled skiers and riders who get tired at a spot that requires three lift rides to get back to base.  Most lifts have a map at the top and a greeter who can give reasonable, although sometimes too detailed, instructions on how to get from there to whereever.  (If I were in charge of that particular detail, I would suggest that such instructions be cast in a form such as: "Well, from here go down X Trail, which is right there.  You'll come to base of Y Lift.  Take it and ask the greeter like me at the top of that lift for directions for the next leg.")  Actually, this is not meant to be funny.  Many times I've come across an upset group that was trying to take a green way home and was, in fact, lost at the top of a choice of two blacks.

Services on the mountain and in the City are expensive, even by ski area standards.  Lunch on the mountain can run $20 for a bread bowl of chili, a salad and a large replenishment of liquid.  (I personally dislike the fact that on-mountain eateries serve alcohol and at PCMR, virtually all of them do.)

The crowd, and it can be very crowded, tend to fall into three groups: (i) duffers who heard from people like me that this is a good family resort and are lost, clueless as to ski trail etiquitte, and on a trail that is too difficult; (ii) fashion plates that make the current scene at Sun Valley look like a Warren Miller movie from the 40's -- they don't really do any damage but interfere greatly with my vision of what people who recreate in the mountains should be like (that is, like me, wearing probably smelly clothes, hiking 500 feet above lifts, enjoying the adrenaline rush of running "don't fall chutes" and having at least a bit of duct tape on something; (iii) millions (well, it seems that way when half of the lower mountain is devoted to training and competition) of school ski team members, national squad hopefuls, NCAA finals, US Olympic selection trials, etc. etc.) of competitors who don't distinguish between the race courses and the public trails -- and by the way, some of the best trails are dedicated to competition.

An absolutely closed boundary.  This is the really bad thing from my point of view.  There are no backcountry gates.  In fact, there is a local ordinance that forbids using lift served facilities to enter areas not part of the ski resort or to enter the ski resort from outside its boundaries other than at the base facilities.  (There are certain exceptions for certain back country tours led by guide services and a few other similar activities, but that just makes me even more upset that I can't do it without paying for a tour!)

The good stuff:  Oh, yes; oh yes.

The area is big with lots of vertical and lots of variety.  It is roughly the case that the entire area is bordered by a continuous ridge.  On the ski resort side of that ridge is an enourmous amount of open and treed faces, open and treed bowls, steep bowls and gentle bowls, mountain peaks with cliff bands cut by challenging chutes -- air if you want it but never mandatory.  Lifts do not reach the most desirable heights, so the best challenging terrain and the nicest rideable trees are left to those who shoulder their skis or tuck their boards under their arm and hike above the crowds. That's good for me.

The big area is home to an large collection of blue trails ranging from mega-vista views down gentle ridge lines to winding, almost path-ways, along descending drainages.  Those blues are nicely groomed to modern standards, most of them on a daily basis, and rarely have any surprises worse than the fact that they are going further from base rather than closer to it.    That is good for my wife.

There is extensive off-piste that is at the Double Blue level:  both the less agressive open bowls and delightful open trees.

And . . .

There is a certain amount of adrenaline rush extreme terrain, mainly off the hike-to tops.  The cliff band on Jupiter Peak, which the broad chute, Machette, cuts through, has routes with mandatory air and sustained 60 degree drops.  Pine Cone Ridge, which I have not yet fully explored, offers a couple of miles of ridge line with open or open treed faces falling back on the in bounds side to a friendly, collector trail that was once the road to one of the more important of the Park City mines.  I've got four or five runs off that ridge and the fact that there are probably 100 variations on out beyond where I've been is an essential part of why I will be a pass holder again next season.

Off mountain, Park City is a lively combination of retirement community, extreme outer ex-urb of Salt Lake City, ski resort, artist colony and arts center and mountain lover Mecca.  It is like a very rare and favorable combination of towns of Taos, Jackson Hole and Ketchum.  Brew Pubs and excellent eateries.  Center for the Sundance Film Festival and its associated events.  More than one X-country area.  

Less important to most one-week-ski-vacationers, access to Park City is rarely compromised by winter weather.  The Canyons roads are frequently slowed or even closed by road and avalanche conditions.  PC is out an important interstate from SLC and it is kept open and moving.  In three years, I have not been precluded from driving a normal automobile from SLC to PC.  (The one-weekers may find themselves cut off at Alta and unable to return to work on Monday -- but, really, is that a bad thing?)

Off-piste, information flow about ski conditions and weather on the PCMR web site is abundant, on point and accurate.  (That's pretty typical of the Wasatch areas.) And, information about short and long-term weather is abundant from the web site and from several other sources, including the Avalance Center and the University of Utah, the meteorology students of which maintain a web site with daily forecasting and reporting of weather and snow conditions on every Utah ski area.  The State Highway sites give real time updates on all of the roads and have strategically placed live cams so you can see conditions for yourself and, as I often do, choose to drive to Park City instead of risking a bob-sled run to Brighton.

Well, there is something else:

THE GREATEST SNOW ON EARTH!

That's what some of the licence plates say.  Whatever, it is good snow.  It is not the famed champagne powder every day, but every year that I've been here -- three seasons plus four prior, short, one-week type trips, there has been snow that has ranged from really fine skiing or riding to just unbelievably great -- look back at last year where I've got a picture sequence of a guy under the Little Cloud lift at Snowbird going over a roller on a named trail and falling and completely disappearing under the powder -- that year was considered to be a so-so season!  Alta barely exceed a 100 inch base on April 1st. Roll Eyes

And, Park City does a good job with that fantastic snow -- the groomers are very well maintained.  To my personal taste, they are just a bit too solid underfoot, but Greens are never icy and Blues rarely so.

No one should be surprised to hear that I will have a Park City pass again next season.  I think that I will pass on the Fast Tracks option.  There were only a couple of weeks when crowds at Park City made it at all useful and the upper mountain lifts that I use the most don't have the fast track feature anyway.  (I'll use the savings from not having Fast Tracks to pair PC with a Big Cottonwood pass -- good for the adjacent areas Brighton and Solitude, effectively turning the two into a single resort that I can pass back and forth between all along their common, open, boundary, riding the lifts on both sides.)

Tommy T.

Wait a minute!! Brew Pubs!  Did I mention Brew Pubs?
Park City has outlets for Squatters, Wasatch, Red Rock and a couple of other local brewers.  It's good to have a local friend who is a member of the Morman church.  Many Mormans are very cosmopolitan and excellent conversationalists, especially if they have done a missionary trip abroad.  And, they can always be the designated driver.

Tommy T.
« Last Edit: April 15, 2014, 04:29:19 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #48 on: April 16, 2014, 08:34:36 AM »

W C Handy wrote "I hate to see that evening Sun go down."   

I hate to see the season end.  A few lifts taken off the daily list.  A couple of bowls closed because only a couple of people are still climbing up to them and that doesn't support a team of 3 patrollers to watch out for them.  Brown spots on the Eastern exposures yesterday are brown Eastern exposures today.  Ski school is closed except for private lessons.   WC's singer probably heads for a dusty bar.

I get lonesome sitting by myself on a 6 seat lift.  I head for the terrain park -- it's not my private patch of virgin woods, but that well packed snow in the jumps will last a long time.

Tommy T.

P.S.:  Get the Bessie Smith version -- one of the greatest blues renditions ever recorded.

« Last Edit: April 16, 2014, 05:57:54 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #49 on: April 17, 2014, 10:56:39 AM »

Actually, yesterday was a full-on day of nearly 30,000 vertical feet -- mostly in the trees above 9000 off the Jupiter lift. Jupiter Peak is closed, PineCone Ridge is closed,  and, on the more accessible side of things, the King Con and its beautiful array of Blue Trails is closed.  The beginners' areas at the base are now completely bare -- a rude greeting for the arriving skier.

I suspect that yesterday was my last day of the season -- that's why I went all out in high woods and put in one my biggest days this year.  Actually, there was very little traffic and loose  on a good base up at the top.  I made six rides on the Jupiter Lift and only saw about 5 other skiers and riders, in the weave, on the lift and on the snow. 

Various pieces of business in the City today; rain on Friday and maybe on Saturday; and closing day at roudy areas are usually not my beer.

We're staying about a month after the ski season ends  --  with no rent to pay there is no reason to pack damp gear on the last day and leave the next morning.  There are a couple of trumpet gigs for me in May, supervising some continuing work on the house, a wine pairing dinner up in Big Cottonwood Canyon  -- oh! we'll be suffering but will manage somehow.

At some time, when I'm bored with nothing else to do, I'll do a report on Brighton --conclusion will tend to "It's a bit limited but nice.  Non-pretencious and easy to use.  If you don't like snowboarders, just stay away."

Tommy T.
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« Reply #50 on: April 18, 2014, 02:35:51 PM »

You try them yet?
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« Reply #51 on: April 19, 2014, 03:34:21 PM »

You try them yet?

I need some help here.  To what or whom does "them" apply?

Board? Bindings? Beers? Brighton? Broads? Bacon omletes with hot salsa?

Tommy T.
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« Reply #52 on: April 20, 2014, 07:48:20 PM »

Last Day!!

Today was the last day for Park City and Brighton, and bunch of other resorts in the region.  Deer Valley and Canyons were already closed (one week ago, I think) and Snowbird has set a tentative date of May 26th but has already started closing whole sections -- all of the Gad lifts, for example, are now down as is the Peruvian Chair lift.

I went up to Brighton for the day and made a pretty leisurely good-bye to the area.  I made my favorite Brighton out-of-bounds run -- basically 1,750 vert. through a zone marked on the map as "cliff area" at the top and then navigable trees below, all on the N. side of the ridge between the area boundary and a major drainage shown on the topo maps as "Hidden Canyon." The run starts at the boundary at the top of the Great Western lift, elevation at 10,250.  Down to about 9,300 it was icy!  Below 9,100 is was slushy!  In between, it varied from a breaking crust to Washington state style mashed potatoes. Threw in a couple of tree runs inbounds which were still rutted and frozen in down to about the same 9,300 to 9,100 zone.  Closed the season with a nice groomer cruise, linking mostly Blues diagonally down from the skier's right top corner to the bottom left corner -- where my van was sitting in the front row of the parking lot.

So!  What about Brighton?

Located at the top of Big Cottonwood Canyon, it's a smaller area, by central Wasatch standards, with about 1000 acres and about 2000 feet vertical from the hike-to top of Clayton Peak to the low spot in the parking lot.  Longest lift vertical is 1,745'. It is served by 5 high-speed quads and a little 150' triple for the beginners. It shares a boundary with Solitude Ski Area, located immediately down-hil on the South side of Big Cottonwood.  (A combined pass serving both areas and allowing unrestricted access back and forth between them is on my plate for next winter.  Solitude also maintains a X-country area which is sort of piece-of-pie-shaped and squeezed in between the two areas and the BCC road.)

It's location is a good spot for snow.  As of today, it's base is at 101 inches while Canyons is closed, Park City is at about 72 and Alta is 103.  The lay-out at Brighton is basically down-hill to the North West and it is located in a pretty narrow canyon so it suffers a lot less from Spring-time Sun than the Park City resorts. It's lifts tend fan out from a single base so from practically any place in-bounds on the hill, going down hill will return you to the parking lot and, at most, a short walk to the major base facilities.

(The Milly Express, serves open terrain below Mt. Millicent, and with a 500' vertical hike up to the top of Millicent, mostly expert and off-piste terrain.  It has all colors available but clearly is the play-ground of those who are beginning to flirt with tougher challenges.  Skiers really cannot accidentally find themselves in the Milli region by a careless turn.  Only a single, well-marked connector trail goes to Milli and it usually requires some walking (or at least some vigorous double polling) along the parking lot.   I hiked part-way up the ridge to the Millicent peak twice this season, but I have yet to challenge the area's showpiece, Elevator -- a steep and narrow chute with rock obstacles coming right off the top.  Like Pinecone Ridge at Park City, it is just sitting there daring me to come back with a season pass for next year.)

Brighton has night skiing which my grandsons find expecially exciting -- just because its different, I supose. Personally, I don't care for the loss of depth perception and the difficulty of judging terrain features that skiing under the lights imposes and I only go there at night when boys are out here visiting.

Terrain Parks are a major aspect of Brighton's appeal to the snowboarders.  Six terrain parks eat up a major swath of otherwise blue terrain straight up from the resort center.  The parks are very big on rails, boxes and variations on those themes.  There is one nice line of small to medium jumps and the parks are graded from beginner to intermediate.  True new-comers can sample park-life without too much risk in Pee Wee Park and shy females have Krista's -- strictly for the beginner to intermediate girls.

Food on the mountain tends to be ski lodge standard, except for the lodge at the base of Milly's.  That is the newest lodge and features some different choices that are more like made-to-order meals.   That lodge is also near the cross-over spot for the Solitude/Brighton joint access connection and makes a nice assembly point if a group breaks into two parts to ski the two hills.

ONE BIG DISADVANTAGE:  Big Cottonwood Canyon road scares me to drive it in the Summer, let alone with snow, ice and avalanche debris all over it in the Winter. For example, the lower section features a double 220 degree switch-back, S-shaped section with no guard rails.  Or, try a downhill run for home with blind 90 degree turns around a butress with loose rock in the traffic lanes.  This winter, a road grader that was clearing snow got off the edge and rolled over!

ONE EXTRA BONUS:  Silver Fork Lodge, a few miles from the top of the road, is one of the best eatries in the U.S. mountains.  It's open for three meals and apres-ski daily and it's located near the highway access points for at least three great back-country routes. It has limited lodging and reserved seating for a few beer or wine pairing dinners each year.  Linda and I go there whenever we get a reasonable chance. It's a great place to meet your pick-up driver after a descent from Canyons down Bear Trap or coming out of Solitude via Silver Fork or after climbing the ridge north from Little Cottonwood at Alta and descending to a welcome beer via Days Fork.

Brighton is sort of a non-competitive place to go relax on snow when you're tired of fashion shows in the Park City zone or of the uber-extreme scions of the very rich in Little Cottonwood Canyon. Hey, don't get me too wrong about this.  I've had two Canyon passes and a PCMR pass, paired with two S'Brd passes over the last three seasons.  My Brighton pairing this year was a nice change of pace -- not a top ten hill.  

Still, next season it is going to be Park City Mountain Resort paired with the Brighton/Solitude combo.

I really like this little hill.  Less of a top ten that an escape from top ten type calculations.  I just go ride and enjoy it once a week or so.

Tommy T.

« Last Edit: April 23, 2014, 10:20:45 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #53 on: April 23, 2014, 07:55:37 AM »

You try them yet?

I need some help here.  To what or whom does "them" apply?

Board? Bindings? Beers? Brighton? Broads? Bacon omletes with hot salsa?

Tommy T.
Haha, the bindings?
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« Reply #54 on: April 23, 2014, 11:36:37 AM »

You try them yet?

I need some help here.  To what or whom does "them" apply?

Board? Bindings? Beers? Brighton? Broads? Bacon omletes with hot salsa?

Tommy T.
Haha, the bindings?

Shoot!  The bacon omletes with hot salsa at the "Pig and a Jelly Jar" at 400E 900S are worth discussing.  ("Who says you can't have beer for breakfast? " That's their motto.  The theme is supposed to be Southern Comfort style home-cooking and the jelly-jar holds the home brewed beer, but between the hot salsa and the Salt Lake City take on beginets I don't feel especially close to  Youghiogheny County --I just like the food-- and I drink coffee for breakfast.)

But, the Flow bindings: They are a rear entry system with a one-piece spider strap to cover the toe and arch of the boot.  Since the end of the Bozeman year, I've been using K2 Cinch rear entry bindings and I like the concept of setting the front strap (or straps, in the case of the K2s) once and not having to reset it every lift ride.  On both models, the rider releases a lever located at the Achiles Tendon area and slides the boot out toward the heel edge.  The K2 heel piece goes out to about 45 dgrees and the boot is removed by raising the boot heel and moving the foot heel up and back.  The Flow heel piece goes back a full 90 degrees and the boot is removed by sliding it more or less straight back.
 In each case, locking the back into place automatically tightens the front piece down on the boot.  The Flow wins the contest for easiest lever to operate.  The K2 lever functions through a cable that is routed across a pair of open channel guides -- the cable easily jumps out of those guides during the openning process and then has to be pushed back in place before closing (this did not happen on my original K2's but was a regular and very annoying problem on the second set).  The Flow cable connects directly to the frame and doesn't require much attention.

The Flow's one piece spider has four connections to the frame, one on each side at the toe and one on each side at the arch.   Instead of being two straps like the K2 or a normal entry binding it is a single piece of flexible material which covers most of the arch and toe area of the boot.  Flow is quite insistent that the spider does not need to be cinched down tight on the boot like normal toe and heel straps -- it relies on its larger area of contract in lieu of higher tension.  This seems to be true.  With no boot distortion or feeling of tightening straps around the toes, the Flow holds the boot just fine for every kind of manuever I've done with them so far.  I've used them for some modest air, some high speed carving, toe and heel pivot turns and a bit of fakie riding.  I have not noticed any problems with boot shift.

All top end bindings should (and most do) have a reasonable range of adjustments affecting such boot factors as toe and heel centering/overhang, forward lean, and downward pressure.  Flow does and, in particular, forward lean is easily adjustable over a useful range.

The last day at Brighton had a little bit of everything and was a good test for the Flows.

In terms of overall board performance, I really can't tell any difference between K2 and Flow.  (Prior to the K2's, I was using Clickers which depend entirely on the boot for stiffness and rigidity of the foot/board interface.  There is a big difference between the rear entry full bindings and the Clicker concept.  I liked Clickers but must admit that there is good reason why they are gone from the market.)  Flow is more comfortable that the K2 when fully clicked in and ready to go.  Flow is less convenient for storage because the binding back will not collapse forward over the board and because, in the unlocked position, the heel piece sticks out about 6 inches past the heel edge horizontally.  (This is not a problem with storage since I own a house that is dedicated to snowboarding; it could be nusiance when trying to stuff a couple of boards so equipped into a Thule box with a few pairs of skis.)

One distictively different characteristic is that movement of the foot straight back to get the boot out from under the spider -- it only took a couple of ins and outs to get used to the motion but I suspect that it would become a serious problem if you are putting the board on facing outward on a steep slope. (But that is always an iffy situation, best to be avoided, isn't it?)

I find the spider and its light degree of distributed pressure on the boot to be quite comfortable.  

Alta is still open, Friday through Sunday, on a few more week-ends.  My Park City pass has three Alta coupons on it.  I may just go crazy and legally telemark Alta for one more day on the season.

Tommy T.

« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 02:01:32 PM by Tommy T » Logged

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« Reply #55 on: April 26, 2014, 04:23:17 PM »



Alta web cam as of this morning.  6" overnight; 6" to 10" during the day; 6" expected tonight.

I'll be there tomorrow!

(Well, I'll be there tomorrow if I can find my telemark boots -- they're someplace in the basement.)

Tommy T.
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Tommy T
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« Reply #56 on: April 28, 2014, 11:57:28 AM »

Well, that storm has totalled 24 inches at Alta and 3" more is expected before it ends today.

Alta's last 3 days will be Fri, Sat, and Sun of this week.  That let's them brag that Alta was still open in May.  It's actually down to two fairly short lifts out of the base, but for me it's a chance for a couple more free runs (already included as a bonus in my Park City pass) and an opportunity to share Alta's "skied the Wasatch in May" brag. 

It is nice to have a flexible schedule.  Or, more correctly, a flexible lack of schedule.

Tommy T.
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« Reply #57 on: April 28, 2014, 09:59:53 PM »

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but I suspect that it would become a serious problem if you are putting the board on facing outward on a steep slope. (But that is always an iffy situation, best to be avoided, isn't it?)
It does seem that as a goofy foot things usually do set up better to make my first turn off my heel edge.
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Tommy T
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« Reply #58 on: April 29, 2014, 09:23:30 AM »

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but I suspect that it would become a serious problem if you are putting the board on facing outward on a steep slope. (But that is always an iffy situation, best to be avoided, isn't it?)
It does seem that as a goofy foot things usually do set up better to make my first turn off my heel edge.

I ride goofy but my natural instincts would be to ride regular.  I did a bit of skate boarding and I was definitely regular.  I kick with my right foot -- I'm not sure that I could hit the ball every time using my left foot.  Same thing with ice skating -- if I am going to land a little hop on one foot it is going to be the right foot or I am going to fall.

My son is a naturally left footed.  When we learned to board, we rented a board and he took a half-day lesson in the morning.  I used the same board for a half-day in the afternoon.  So, the board was set up goofy in the rental shop and that's way I rode it.  Now I've riden so many hours over the course of 30 years that I am completely comfortable riding goofy.  One advantage is that I can ride fakie very well.  I can land small jumps either way.  When I started surfing after about 15 years of boarding, I just naturally stepped onto the board with my right foot forward.

I don't have any discernable edge preference under most circumstances, but as an instructor I noticed that most students, from beginner well into the intermediate skill levels master smooth, large radius turns to heel-side first.  I think that it is harder to use your upper body incorrectly when on heel-side and it is more comfortable having a view down the hill (which seems to be the way you are going even if you are in a traverse).  it may just come down to toe-side you can bend over at the waist, look at your feet and reach for the ground -- all things you generally shouldn't do.  Heel side you don't bend that way, you can't see your feet and your arms don't go very far that way.  It is harder to use bad technique heel-side -- you tend to stand up straighter, look where you are going instead of at the snow, and your arms are more likely to be toward the nose of the board than toward the ground at your heels.  I have no reason to think that there is any goofy/regular preference difference as to heel side/toe side when it comes to snow boarding.

Surfing may be a different matter primarily because of group dynamics on a wave.  I've heard surfers complain about goofy riders on the break.  

Tommy T.



« Last Edit: May 02, 2014, 04:39:22 PM by Tommy T » Logged

Only put off until tomorrow what you are willing to die having left undone.
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« Reply #59 on: May 02, 2014, 11:43:43 AM »

I naturally surf regular foot and I naturally snowboard and skateboard goofy.  I can ride switch on both but not good enough to drop in on double overhead surf goofy, or drop in on Tux Regular.
We had a 10 foot halfpipe in our yard growing up so I skateboarded a lot of vert.  In the half pipe I didn't seem to ever notice which foot forward mattered, but skateboarding on the street I was absolutely goofy footed.
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